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'48 CJ2A #204853, Pietermaritzburg, South Africa

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JeepSaffer View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote JeepSaffer Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 Nov. 2015 at 2:15am
So the T90 rebuild is complete!
 
 
 
I'm pleased with the outcome - this is my first T90. Heck, it's my first gearbox!!!
 
I've got one or two technical questions which I've posted over on the Tech Q&A page. Head on over if you think you can help:
 
Thanks for checking in!
 
Mike
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote Beer4MeThx Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30 Nov. 2015 at 9:29am
Looks really good!  Was it pretty easy to do?  What did it look like when you started?  My gearbox is full of rust.  Debating on trying to reuse it or get a used one.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote JeepSaffer Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30 Nov. 2015 at 2:49pm
Thanks Beer4Me,
 
It is not difficult. If you take time to read the various guides available, understand how it all works, and are patient in the rebuild, anyone should be able to do it.
 
You can see how my gearbox looked earlier in the build if you scroll back through my project thread. It was not in terrible condition, but reportedly jumped out of second gear, which is a fairly common problem. Since I am doing a complete rebuild from the bottom up, this was just one of the items to tick off! Transfercase next!
 
Mine did not have much rust, so I could re-use most of the gears, excepting the problematic 2nd gear. If yours does have rust, you should probably count on all new internals. Most good rebuild kits will include small parts, new front and rear bearings, and a new countershaft of decent hardness. So all you will need to add will be the gears themselves, and you will be good to go.
 
I made my own rebuild guide from various sources, mostly based on Rick Stivers well known guide, but modified where I found his instructions a little unclear, or I found a better way of doing things, or he didn't mention something that I found important. If you want this let me know.
 
Cheers -
 
Mike
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Beer4MeThx Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30 Nov. 2015 at 3:25pm
That's what I'm afraid of.  A new kit is over $200, add in a couple gears and you are in for another 2.  I'm pretty sure I could get a used working one for less.  Just gonna have to do some looking.

If you go to the How To information section of the forums I added a video of a t-case rebuild.  The guy goes in to pretty good detail.  I found it helpful to watch.  Beer
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote JeepSaffer Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 Dec. 2015 at 1:52am
December 2015:
 
I've made some good progress on cleaning up the transfer case, and painting it. Now ready for the rebuild!
 
 
 
The springs have all been disassembled, stripped and cleaned leaf by leaf, and then painted. I can't tell you how good they look compared to how they started! It was a lot of work but worth it in the end.
 
 
Finally (and perhaps most exciting) the rims have come back from the paint shop. Luzon Red looks good!
 
 
 
I still have a long way to go, but the progress is evident!
 
Thanks for checking in, and Happy Christmas to all flatfender owners...
 
Mike
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote JeepSaffer Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30 Dec. 2015 at 7:27am
So I've had a few days off over Christmas, and that means a little more time to progress the rebuild...
 
I have been able to locate, restore and put back together an original speedometer. It is an Autolite, and seemed to be in fairly good condition, apart from a peeling paint job and needing to be cleaned up. I removed the bezel, did some nominal cleaning on the inside, oiled all the gears, tested it to see that it worked freely, painted the bezel and inner ring matt black, resealed the glass to the bezel with a little RTV bead, and put it all back together. It is not perfect, but I am pleased with the outcome, especially seeing as it is my first one! The glass has one or two small scratches, but nothing serious and I figure it is part of the history of this jeep, so I left them. Here is a pic before I started.
 
 
And here the finished product...
 
 
The case got a coat of clear lacquer just for fun, and because I like the fact that there is a faint stamp on the back of the case saying where the speedo was made, in Lacrosse, Wisconsin.
 
 
The crimping of the bezel back onto the case was not easy, but it can be done with a reasonable result if you are patient and take care.
 
 
Apart from that I am about half way through my transfer case rebuild.
 
 
There weren't enough shims in the Novak Adapter kit to get the endplay adjustment right - I had to go back, clean up and reuse some of my old shims from when I took it apart. You can see that the final shim pack in the photo is quite thick, certainly more than I expected. It is the entire Novak shim pack plus the thickest shim from my old shims. Has anyone else experienced this? Endplay is now 0.003" before I do the final seal of each shim. I'm expecting to end up with between 0.003 and 0.004" at the end.
 
That's it for the moment, Happy Christmas everybody and here's to a GREAT 2016!!!!
 
Mike
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Oilleaker1 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30 Dec. 2015 at 7:33am
I don't see the yoke installed on the shaft. I think you have to have it on and tight to check bearing load and endplay. Great job on the speedo! John
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote JeepSaffer Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30 Dec. 2015 at 10:25am
Hi John,
 
 
Thanks for your comments and suggestions.
 
Now, important to differentiate between the "cups" and the "caps"....! LOL
 
From what I can work out from the exploded parts diagramme of the transfer case, the endplay is determined by the depth of seating in the case of each of the cone bearing cups on each end of the output shaft. The further these are apart (one on the rear bearing cap side and one on the front bearing cap side) the more the endplay on the shaft, as the cone bearings seat on the inside of each cup. Now, the depth of the bearing cup seating in the case is controlled entirely by the 3/4 round lip on the front bearing cap and the full indent in the rear bearing cap. I used Rick Stivers method of only partially installing the cups and using the bearing caps themselves to pull the respective cups in to the correct depth as the cap bolts are tightened. This means that the cups are only pulled in to the case as far as the caps will pull them, and each cup should be resting snug against each cap. When I had too few shims installed, the rear cap pulled the rear cup too far into the case until it was tight up against the bearing cone and there was no endplay at all. I then removed the cap, used a large screwdriver between the case and the output shaft gear to slide the gear, output shaft, and bearing cone towards the rear. This moved the bearing cup back out of the case. I added shims to the pack, meaning that on the next attempt the rear bearing cap pulled the bearing cup less far into the case, thus increasing the endplay on the shaft.
 
Your suggestion of installing the yoke on the shaft (I presume you mean front yoke and not rear companion flange) would not affect the cone bearings vs bearing cup relationship, as the yoke is installed and tightened onto the output clutch shaft, which is not fixed to the output shaft. This would pull the output clutch shaft up snug against the output shaft clutch bearing, but I don't see that it would affect the output shaft endplay reading.
 
Does this make sense? It really has to be read with an exploded parts diagramme for reference!!! Confused
 
I am learning and understanding as I go along, so please correct me if I am wrong. But that is my take on the whole thing!
 
Cheers.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Oilleaker1 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30 Dec. 2015 at 10:54am
All sounds correct except the output shafts apply pressure to the bearings on the inner race as the yoke is torqued tight against it by the castlelated nuts. Try that and see. John
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote JeepSaffer Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 Jan. 2016 at 1:29pm
So I figured out my error with the shim pack. It was a pretty rookie error and I felt a bit stupid about it afterwards Embarrassed
 
Rick Stivers rebuild guide uses the bearing caps to pull the bearing cups the correct distance into the case. The front cap instruction reads like this:
 
"Install the cap without the gasket sealer at this time"
 
What Rick means is that the cap and gasket should be installed, but without the final gasket sealant. I understood that no gasket should be used at all.
 
So the end result for me was that the front bearing cup was pulled too far into the case (by the thickness of the missing gasket), meaning that my whole output shaft arrangement was shifted to the rear of the case. I was able to set endplay adjustment, but didn't have enough shims and had to clean up and add some shims from my old pack.
 
It didn't sit well with me overnight - such a tight adjustment, but the gasket is simply ignored...? Anyway, I re-read the guide in the morning and it all made sense for me. Use the gasket in the set-up, just don't apply sealant!
 
The new result is that I re-set my endplay and was able to get 0.004", and I didn't need anymore shims than the original shim-pack that came with the rebuild kit.
 
I guess all's well that ends well. I'll know for next time!
 
Happy New Year All!
 
Mike
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote JeepSaffer Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 Jan. 2016 at 12:38pm
Today I got the frame out of the garage for the first time since I have owned the Jeep!
 
I cut off all the PO modifications:
- two brackets welded to the front frame horns for attaching spotlights
- A bracket welded to the left inner frame horn for attaching a shock absorber to the tie rod, presumably to control steering death wobble (!!!) Clap
- Towbar modification to the rear bumper
- Additional body mount brackets in various odd places
 
I then was able to pressure clean the frame in preparation for sandblasting and painting.
 
So here it is in all it's glory!
 
 
Looks like someone has found it worth guarding! LOL
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Mike S Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 07 Jan. 2016 at 12:51am
You are making progress and , hopefully, having fun.

On the speedo… there is a little notch in the speedo cutout on the dash. There is a corresponding 'V' shaped bump on the case. These need to match up. It is perfectly possible to assemble the speedo with the case UPSIDE DOWN. Ask me how I know this.Embarrassed
'47 CJ2A -- #114542
Warn FF D41 rear
Lock-Right locker
11" drum brakes
Dual master cylinder
T90C Transmission
16 X 6 Jeep truck wheels
Cooper STT Pro tires
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote JeepSaffer Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 June 2016 at 12:47pm
So it has been some time that I haven't updated my project post, and it is nothing more than not having much time available.

I have been travelling a lot internationally with my job recently. Then my whole family came to visit from Europe in February. And I also had a lapse of judgement and I entered firstly a 35 mile/56km running race in March, and then a 56 mile/90km race in mid-May. Both of these required a fair amount of training and time...

BUT, the good news is that I have squeaked a few minutes here and there to carry on with the Jeep, so at least the project didn't stand completely idle. Herewith the updates:

In Feb I stripped, sandblasted and painted up my frame. This is all good to go now!



Here it is all painted up (actually, I think this was one of the undercoats...)



Next up was the body, off to the sandblaster to get all the old paint and tons of bondo body filler off! The tub fitted perfectly on my old flatbed trailer Smile



What was revealed underneath was a ton of poor patchwork repairs by previous owners, rusted panels and general no goodness...







So I hauled the body all the way down to Cape Town to Reynier at CJ2 Engineering, while I did my 35 mile race there. This is an 1,800km journey, each way! He is the only guy I know of in South Africa who works with Jeep bodies and is able to fabricate and replace whole panels.





Apart from getting a whole bunch of information, and taking loads of pictures of how things SHOULD be on my Jeep, Reynier replaced both front quarter panels on my tub, both rear tailgate panels, both floorpans, closed various holes that should not have been there, re-welded various bad welds on the fenders and hood, straightened my bent and stretched load bin, repaired my windshield outerframe bottom bar and facing panel, made me a new tailgate, and sent me home with a new battery tray, brake pedal arm, and various other bits and hard to find pieces. I owe Reynier a ton of thanks for doing this all in 7 days while I was in his part of the world! This is how my tub looks now:





Some minor panel beating remains to get things straightened out further and close some more holes Reynier didn't have time to close, but I have a whole, rust-free tub that is probably in the best shape it's been in since it came out of the factory!

In April I finished the reassembly of the T90 top cover and got that all back together. I was so excited to shift gears I pulled the mainshaft out of the main drive gear and dropped all the pilot bearings into the bottom of the case Clap. Rookie error! But I managed to get them loaded back in without too much rework, and I won't make that mistake again!


 
(Most of my finished parts are sitting in the dining room at home, because of my lack of space in the garage!)

Next up was the transfercase: This is mostly finished now. I am rebuilding the handbrake at the moment, but the transfercase itself is all together, and all seals are in.

I have to admit I did not do much in May, because of the big 56 mile race. Check out www.comrades.com if you are interested. I stumbled over the line in 9h14. Dead

This last weekend I got my back axle back together, including brakes. This is almost ready to put back on the frame now...



Sorry, I can't figure out how to rotate the pictures in this forum....

The only other exciting news is that I had a friend going to Canada who offered to go light and bring back parts for me. This is a big deal because the shipping and import duties we pay internationally, especially for heavy items, just about doubles the cost of the item. So he brought back an NOS Carter WO carb (near impossible to find, even used, in South Africa), a Warn overdrive (which I found on Ebay, and am very excited about.... These are rare as hens teeth here) and a brake rivet press to allow me to fit the new brake linings I have to the old brake shoes. 

So, as you can see, I have been chipping away at the project. Still lots to do, but I feel I have made some progress and once you start REASSEMBLING, rather than DISASSEMBLING, you really feel like you have turned a corner.

Thanks for reading, and I hope to post another update sooner than 6 months time!!! Smile

Mike
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Flatfender Ben Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 June 2016 at 11:02pm
Wow that tub looks great.
Awesome you where able to get an O-D makes a jeep so much better to drive.

Also your brake shoes are on wrong. On a Willys they go the other way. Long shoe to the front.

Edited by Flatfender Ben - 22 June 2016 at 11:05pm
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote JeepSaffer Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 June 2016 at 3:37am
Thanks for the comments Ben! I appreciate the encouragement and advice.

Funnily enough, the brake shoes are actually the same size - the one shoe appearing longer than the other is an optical illusion created by the angle of the camera. I know this is not correct for the Willys, but it is how I got the Jeep. I'm not sure that I would be able to find just two short shoes to correct it.

I'm planning on running it with equal sized shoes front and back. Is there any immediate danger with doing this?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Flatfender Ben Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 June 2016 at 10:16pm
Oh sure enough same size.
My bad
As long as they don't hang up,I would run them.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Oilleaker1 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 June 2016 at 7:17am
I see you have bonded linings and not riveted. They should work fine. The big problem with a Willys  CJ is if previous owners have turned the drums. They then have shoe contact that does not adjust properly and less brakes. I try not to turn drums. You are better off getting new. Some can shim the linings out when riveting, but it's alot of work.  Gov't rules on import/export in your country sounds painful. What's easy here in the US isn't with you. Do they go crazy if you buy a Jeep here in the US and try and ship it there? John
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote JeepSaffer Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 July 2016 at 9:45am
Hey John, nice to hear from you again. It's been a while!

Yes, the wheel brake shoes are bonded, they obviously have been replaced by a PO before I bought this jeep. Funnily enough I just got my emergency brake shoes sorted out yesterday. The old ones were still riveted, but completely worn out, past the head of the rivet in some places. I got NOS linings from Peter deBella and got them riveted on yesterday.






The guy at the brake shop that riveted them for me said that he also does drum turning. Then he puts on oversized linings and radius grinds them to match the new radius of the drum. So that's another way of doing it that would avoid the need for shims. Smile Nice guy... and he didn't charge me anything for the riveting either...

Yes, the rules here are painful. Anything can be imported, but the duty is heavy. Its about 50% on parts. On a complete car I think it is 100%, so double the purchase price, even before you have paid shipping...
Left hand drive vehicles used to be allowed (we drive on the right of the vehicle), but then I think they changed the regulations so that these actually can't be imported anymore. Those that were in the country already were allowed to stay, but no new imports of LHD vehicles allowed! So old Jeeps are only going to get more and more rare in SA....

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