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2019 FCT Prep Projects

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unclemoak View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote unclemoak Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 July 2019 at 7:53pm
The aftermath of the third transfer case tear down. This one will have the parking brake assembly harvested from it.

This one was a little rougher. Surprisingly though, it did have safety wire on all the right bolts and did have copper washers under a lot of them to help with sealing it up.




All the guts to the parking brake as still there.


Intermediate shaft on this one has seen better days.


The aftermath of tearing down all three cases. I'll have to start sorting through and cleaning the parts to pick out which ones are in the best shape.

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oldtime View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote oldtime Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 July 2019 at 8:03pm
Jeep never had D20 with factory twin sticks. 
Jeep had several versions of the single stick on all of their Dana 20 units.
Removing them from an  IH D20 is the only way to get factory sticks for use in a D 20 Jeep.

Currently building my final F-134 powered 3B .
T98-A Rock Crawler using exclusive factory parts and Approved Special Equipment from the Willys Motors era (1953-1963)
Zero aftermarket parts

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unclemoak View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote unclemoak Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 July 2019 at 12:06am
Originally posted by oldtime oldtime wrote:

Jeep never had D20 with factory twin sticks. 
Jeep had several versions of the single stick on all of their Dana 20 units.
Removing them from an  IH D20 is the only way to get factory sticks for use in a D 20 Jeep.


Good to know!
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unclemoak View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote unclemoak Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 July 2019 at 12:11am
Next up was harvesting the bearing retainer out of the T86. The retainer is needed to replace the one in the T90 to go from the standard small hole style, to the big hole style of the Dana 20 or later big hole Dana 18 which is also sometimes used for a Teralow swap.

I got this transmission for pennies, I almost felt bad getting it for just the bearing retainer, but after opening it up, I didn't feel so bad, since the guts were grenaded. 



As you can see, the guts were toast. 






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unclemoak View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote unclemoak Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 July 2019 at 8:11pm
Cleaned up some miscellaneous transfer parts this morning. 

Being the 4th, I had to do something overly American, so I spent half the day shortening and threading some rifle barrels.


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unclemoak View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote unclemoak Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 July 2019 at 9:54pm
Managed to get a broken thermostat housing stud removed today using the tried and true nut welding technique. 












Problem #1

While trying to figure out what to do with the combination of front plate, flywheel, starter, and bell housing configuration issues, I realized I have quite the dilemma.

Out of the three engines and a sundry of other parts I have, nothing seems to match. My backup MB engine is a chain drive and currently has a 97 tooth flywheel and doesn't match the gear drive 124 tooth original engine that came out of the jeep. I had originally just planned on swapping the front plates and using the MB started and flywheel, but today it dawned on me that I didn't have a chain drive front plate that would work with the 3a frame mounts. 

The front engine plate that came on the MB engine had previously been modified to work on a non-jeep application. I did order a NOS one from QTM to put it back to it's original configuration once the motor is relieved of backup duty.  

I think the best solution, rather than modify one of my 3a front plates to work with the chain-drive, is going to be take the franken-plate currently on the MB engine and franken-plate it even more to give me a chain-drive front plate, with 3a mount ears.


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Lee (MN) View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Lee (MN) Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 July 2019 at 10:45pm
You can modify the 3A front plate to work on the chain drive engine, I believe Tim Hawkridge has done it!, perhaps he will chime in here.

Lee
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44 GPW-The Perfected Willys
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unclemoak View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote unclemoak Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 July 2019 at 11:14pm
Originally posted by Lee (MN) Lee (MN) wrote:

You can modify the 3A front plate to work on the chain drive engine, I believe Tim Hawkridge has done it!, perhaps he will chime in here.

Lee


I’m sure it’s possible, I think in my cases since I have two 3a, an NOS MB, and the franken-plate, it’ll be easiest to modify the franken-plate to work. 

After the trip, I’ll likely sell off the MB engine, so I want to switch it back to its original configuration. Same with my two 3a engines. No sense in cutting up a good plate. 

I already have some wild hot-rodding ideas for the rebuilt 3a engine after the trip. 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote athawk11 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 July 2019 at 11:38pm
This is a GPW engine mounted on a 3A frame with a 3A plate.  The only mod needed is to close this gap.  I welded the plate.  Good thing is...if you want to undo it, you just need to grind your weld back off...



1- 1946 CJ2A   
2- 1949 CJ3A
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unclemoak View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote unclemoak Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 July 2019 at 11:56pm
Good info! I didn’t know a gear drive plate would work on a chain drive. 

This might make things a bit simpler. 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote oldtime Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06 July 2019 at 10:53am

Here again save this T86AA case. They are not so very common.
It has real value to anyone wanting to build a T90 J inside the T86AA case.
Such a custom transmission easily replaces and is superior in strength to the T86AA .
Currently building my final F-134 powered 3B .
T98-A Rock Crawler using exclusive factory parts and Approved Special Equipment from the Willys Motors era (1953-1963)
Zero aftermarket parts

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unclemoak View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote unclemoak Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 07 July 2019 at 12:12pm
Originally posted by oldtime oldtime wrote:

Here again save this T86AA case. They are not so very common.
It has real value to anyone wanting to build a T90 J inside the T86AA case.
Such a custom transmission easily replaces and is superior in strength to the T86AA .

You're welcome to the case and guts if you want them.
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unclemoak View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote unclemoak Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 08 July 2019 at 4:58pm
69 days and counting

I started cleaning up transfer case parts over the weekend. I like to soda blast stuff to get it nice and clean. I never liked the finish that sand blasting leaves. 




I did start ordering a pile of parts. I'm sure my USPS person is going to hate me even more than normal.



After inspecting  the transfer case, I ordered a new front output bushing, shift rail covers/plugs, poppet springs and balls, and  output bearings/cups. The Teralow set came in too and it came with a full gasket set. I’ve had it on order for about a month from Advanced Adapters, but they were waiting on something causing the delay. I am still waiting on the tapered bearing kit from Advanced Adapters, but they said it might not be until mid-August until they are able to ship it.

I’d like to get the T90c built first with the guts out of the transfer case just to make it a bit easier to get on and off while I shim the main shaft. For the T90c, I already have two complete T90's, a new cluster gear and NOS input shaft, just waiting on the rebuild kit from Novak.


I’ve been stocking up on spares as well. My Delco 10si alternator came along with the new pulley to concert it to 5/8” instead of the standard 3/8” 


For the windshield latch repair, I picked up new rubber. While removing the windshield, I realized one of the pivot bolts was missing, so I have those in order too. 

This is the tray I want to remove to make the vent functional again. You can see that the 3a latch about the vent door is busted off. I have a new one to spot weld on, but that's going to require removing the windshield, hence the new rubber bits.



Mis-matched pivot bolts.



Edited by unclemoak - 08 July 2019 at 5:12pm
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote unclemoak Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 July 2019 at 10:05pm
68 days to go!

I had an eye doctor appointment this afternoon, so dilated eyes were not doing me any favors to see for sh*t this evening. 

I did take off the oil pan and valve cover. The insides were very clean. Surprisingly even the pals nuts were still on the rod caps. 



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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote unclemoak Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 July 2019 at 10:40pm
67 Days to go


Parts arrivals for the day - New rear axle seals and shims, windshield pivot bolts, and rear top bow brackets.

Parts on order - crank bearings, rod bearings, manifold studs, timing chain, rings, cam shaft bolt lock tabs, and some misc oil line fittings.

The machine shop called today about my spare engine I dropped off last week.  Head checked out okay, but had some minor leaks in the head bolt holes that they are going to sleeve to fix. 

I spent a little more time this evening inspecting the engine, removing the valve train, and measuring the crank bearings. Given the state of the engine, my plan remains to replace the bearings, install new rings, re-cut the valve seats, and put it back together. 

Given that everything looks to be in good shape, I'm confident that this engine has a lot of life left in it.





Some of the valve seats looked a little rough. I do have the Neway cutter and a whole new valve train to install.


The exhaust seats for #2 and #3 looked the worst.



This engine seems to be full of pleasant surprises. Even the crank bearings are at the original size and don't look half bad.



Edited by unclemoak - 10 July 2019 at 11:15pm
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote unclemoak Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 July 2019 at 6:24pm
64 days to go

I am having a bear of a time getting the valve guides out of the block using all-thread and nuts. In order to not get frustrated, I opted to switch tasks to tearing down the rest of the block.

On an unrelated note, it was cool to clean up exterior engine parts and see the original OD green paint under the JD green. 

In order to get the rest of the engine apart, I had to ream the tops of the cylinders to get the pistons to slide out. It's a pretty simple task, just tighten the reamer and spin it around, check your progress, and keep going until the ridge is gone.



After pulling out the pistons, I took a look at them and #2 was kind of weird. In addition to on of the rings missing a section, it had an unusual oil ring groove compared to the other pistons.

The top ring is missing a huge section.



Piston #2 is on the right. 








The stripped block, almost reason to hone the cylinders. 

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote unclemoak Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 July 2019 at 9:59pm
62 days to go


After posting on Saturday, I gave the valve guides some more work. Since I wasn't having much luck with using all-thread to pull the guides out, I just decided to pull the cam (it needed pulled anyway during honing to not get covered in debris) and pound the guides up through the block. This approach seemed to work MUCH easier. After getting them going, it was smooth sailing to get them tapped the rest of the way out. I just used a long piece of 1/2" bar stock I had laying around to go through the tappet bores from the bottom, using care not to nick the bores.



As you can see, these guides have seen better days.


Some bad news from the machine shop. I had known the block I dropped off wasn't in the greatest of shape. I didn't see any visible cracks in the block, however when it was cleaned and magnafluxed, a huge vertical crack became apparent in cylinder #4. I inquired about welding up the crack and sleeving it, but they didn't think it could be saved even after all that. 

Luckily a quick call to my good buddy Steve got me another block and some extra heads. I'm certainly no engine builder, but some other guy brought this block back to Steve a few weeks ago because he didn't want to pay to have it line bored. I can't seem to figure out why, since it appears that he had all the other machine work done. The block appears to have been sleeved, hardened valve seats put in, new cam bearing, and decked. I'm not quite sure what the deal is, but I'll drop it off hopefully soon to the machine shop (two hours away) and see what they think.





Edited by unclemoak - 15 July 2019 at 10:04pm
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote unclemoak Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 July 2019 at 11:40pm
8 Weeks or 56 days to go

Parts updates - Finally got a shipping notification from Novak that my T90 rebuild kit shipped. 

M38 Mike and I have been going back and forth about stickers for this years FCT. The past few days, my designer has been working on drafting up a logo. We'll have a pile of these to hand out at the Tour, so if you want one, make sure to come find me.





Since it's been unbearably hot here in Wisconsin, I've shied away from working out in the garage. 

Today my Amazon spot welder came, so I figured it was a good of a day as any to work on my windshield. I figured since I likely will need it for a few other body projects later down the road, I might as well pick on up. It was like $160, and I can always use a good excuse to buy more tools to have around my machine shop.



I did have to adjust the tongs out of the box since they were a little mis-aligned. 



I had watched a few videos earlier today for some pointers and some people had issues with burning through metal, so I did a few practice welds on some scrap titanium coupons that I had laying around. It was pretty easy to clamp up on the two pieces to hit the momentary switch to fuse them together. 




My 3a had this makeshift tray attached to the vent, which I wanted to remove to make the vent functional again, but of course the latch was busted off. Thankfully Terry B from the 3a page makes some latches to fix this. 



The first step was to remove the tray and use a cold chisel to knock off the old latch remnants.


Next was to get the windshield out so I could access that area with the spot welder. The ancient rubber gasket crumbled when I took it out, so I was glad I already had a replacement. 


I cut the lip of the gasket, so I didn't have to wrestle with the windshield out and risk breaking it more (already has a small crack in it)

 

It was kind of cool to see some more of the original forest green paint hidden under the gasket.



I got the bright idea to use some weld through primer, though I found that I had to sand it all back off to get the spot welder to work. Seems it couldn't weld through the primer very well.



Holy sh*t, was it ever a pain to get this welded. After doing a few welds on the test coupon, I thought the welding was going to be the easiest part. Boy was I wrong. First, the welder weighs about 30 lbs. While I'm no weakling, it is taxing to hold the welder with one hand and position the latch with the other. After a few attempts, it didn't seem to want to make a connections. I found that the two layers of the windshield frame had separated ever so slightly which didn't allow the welder to make a connection. I put a few spot welds on those two first to get them back together, then was finally able to get the latch welded on. It did take much longer to get the latch on due to the thickness of the material, but I just left it sit there and cook until the latch was almost white hot and it seems to have fastened quite nicely.


I think tomorrow I'm going to call around to a few glass places to see if someone can cut me a new windshield. After all that work (probably two hours start to finish) to get the latch repaired, I figured I might as well put a new piece of glass in there too while I'm at it.



Edited by unclemoak - 18 July 2019 at 11:44pm
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