Forum Home Forum Home > CJ-2A Discussion Area > Your Jeep Project
  New Posts New Posts RSS Feed - '48 # 150870 resto/semi GPW clone
  FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Events   Register Register  Login Login

'48 # 150870 resto/semi GPW clone

 Post Reply Post Reply Page  12>
Author
Message
hooptytank View Drop Down
Member
Member


Joined: 12 Feb. 2012
Location: Santa Monica,CA
Status: Offline
Points: 22
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote hooptytank Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: '48 # 150870 resto/semi GPW clone
    Posted: 12 Feb. 2012 at 4:12am
Finally hopped on a CJ2A. Actually my dad did. He's been wanting a WWII Jeep since he was a young kid, never had the opportunity or time to have one. I have somewhat of an automotive background, so it's only logical that I'd be involved in the purchasing decision, and the ensuing project.

First off we had to learn about Jeeps... MBs, GPWs, CJ2As,M38s,CJ3s. We were complete Jeep newbies. With a rough understanding of the different models, started looked for many months, at dozens of trucks from the rotted out pile of crud, to the more or less finished restoration and everything between. We also had to decide whether to find a real MB/GPW or make a clone. We chose the latter.

I know that there is always the argument of keeping it original and destroying a cars value. But this one is ours and the decision is finalized. IMHO when you'll see the finished product, purists should be relieved that no butchery was involved, and it's been brought closer to "original" than when we purchased it.

Enough chatter, on to pictures:

Some examples we looked at starting with a nice 46 and a less than optimal 51 mM38, I think...





We ended up with this fine specimen below. Been sitting since 1999, it had been painted in the 80s. It wasn't in running condition but the owner swore the drivetrain was solid, there were 2 minor rust bubbles showing under the paint, driver floorboard hat channel rusted through and some rust pitting on the floorboards under the tank and inside toolbox. Otherwise it was complete minus the tailgate, any tools, original top and bows, and original wheels. It came with a Warn winch, Warn front hubs, a Powr-lok front diff, and 11 inch brakes.





The deal was struck, loaded on a flatbed and got it home. This is how it sat on 12/12/11:








Edited by hooptytank - 12 Feb. 2012 at 2:11pm
Back to Top
hooptytank View Drop Down
Member
Member


Joined: 12 Feb. 2012
Location: Santa Monica,CA
Status: Offline
Points: 22
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote hooptytank Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 Feb. 2012 at 4:28am
Having problems with pic links from shutterfly. Bare with me while I try to figure something out

Edit: Post updated with pics. Shutterfly no longer allows external links to pictures, unless its a URL. moved to Picasa. Also photobucket usually limits bandwidth or amount of uploaded pics. Also this forum seems to handle html tags differently than other forums I'm used to posting on.

Now on to getting it running. Clean the carb, replace the gas tank which was swiss cheese, replace some hoses, replace brake master and wheel cylinders, and all fluids.




 On craigslist I scored 5 16" wheels with brand new 15 year old Deman NDT, a tailgate, and a blackout driving light










Edited by hooptytank - 12 Feb. 2012 at 2:28pm
Back to Top
wrdabney View Drop Down
Member
Member
Avatar

Joined: 04 Oct. 2011
Location: Jackson, TN
Status: Offline
Points: 840
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote wrdabney Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 Feb. 2012 at 10:29am
I use photbucket with no problem. Looking forward to seeing it.
TnFFC facebook page
President, TnFFC
Tennesseeflatfenderclub@yahoo.com
'47 T3-C # 23839
'48 CJ2A Body tag # 20xx52
Back to Top
sean View Drop Down
Moderator Group
Moderator Group

Sponsor Member

Joined: 20 July 2005
Location: North Idaho
Status: Offline
Points: 7358
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote sean Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 Feb. 2012 at 11:04am
Originally posted by hooptytank hooptytank wrote:

Having problems with pic links from shutterfly. Bare with me while I try to figure something out
You're copy/pasting actual HTML that includes URL encodes (the "%3d"s).  That won't work:
<img src="http://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47a2df03b3127cceff7947de7e0200000030O00QaNmjJsxbMge3nww/
cC/f%3D0/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D720/ry%3D480/"/>

Have to keep burrowing at shutterfly until you find the actual image that ends in ".jpg" or similar image extension, and copy ONLY the part in double-quotes. eg:
http://im1.shutterfly.com/media/ ....... /photo.jpg

Sean



Edited by sean - 12 Feb. 2012 at 11:10am
Back to Top
hooptytank View Drop Down
Member
Member


Joined: 12 Feb. 2012
Location: Santa Monica,CA
Status: Offline
Points: 22
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote hooptytank Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 Feb. 2012 at 2:48pm
Took it for a drive in the Malibu canyons, the day after Christmas. The engine ran fine, compression is 115 psi in all holes, the brakes were nice but pulled. The biggest problem was popping out of 2nd. Common for the T90 trans.









Everything went well until I backed it into the driveway. It started dumping 90wt with fierce intensity from the input shaft. Figured the trans was going to need a rebuild so no biggie.

Back to Top
hooptytank View Drop Down
Member
Member


Joined: 12 Feb. 2012
Location: Santa Monica,CA
Status: Offline
Points: 22
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote hooptytank Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 Feb. 2012 at 3:26pm
The two week overhaul: One discussion led to another and we decided to do a frame off resto. My dad had the intention of getting it done in 2 weeks, I was thinking more like 4 weeks. Needless to say, neither deadlines were met. This Jeep was supposed to be a "retirement" project for dad, but I guess he changed his mind to wanting to drive it to work before that time.

The deconstruction starts 12/27/11, yank the body, drivetrain, strip the chassis, get everything to the sandblasters.












 
The sandblasters also have an ironworking shop, so in the interest of time I had them patch up some of the holes, and they also painted all the parts with etching primer I provided them. the chassis was painted with some black enamel they use. It's not POR 15, and in retrospect I wish I used that, but this will do for the next 20-30 years. The sheetmetal patching was OK, not show quality, but definitely not junk. For the money and time it saved me I couldn't be happier.







Frame done and body ready for paint. We decided to have a "pro" do the body work and paint it. Got quotes as low as 1800 as high as 6500. we went the cheapest route possible, with a promise it will be done in 5 days. 5 days later it was sitting in the same spot where we dropped it off, so  forget that. We foresaw problems with the whole job, plus the quality of the  work I saw was less than superb. you get what you pay for.  So we loaded it back up  and took it home. Afterall it's a Jeep, it's a project, we'll do it ourselves.




Back to Top
hooptytank View Drop Down
Member
Member


Joined: 12 Feb. 2012
Location: Santa Monica,CA
Status: Offline
Points: 22
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote hooptytank Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 Feb. 2012 at 3:58pm
While the body was being shuffled around to the sandblaster and body shop, we started the cleaning and rebuilding process of all other parts. The diffs and springs got cleaned and painted. Didn't open them up since they didn't leak, YET.





The powertrain was cleaned and degreased in prep for paint or rebuild.



A lot of other chassis components were cleaned, I welded up the worn out clutch cross shaft tube hole and worn out rod.





Engine was painted. Since it had oil pressure, didn't leak and ran fine, decided not to touch it, YET.



Cleaned the PCV valve. It was blocked up solid. you can see about 1/2 the junk I pulled out of it in the parts tray.





Cleaned and lubed the distributor. the shaft didn't have much play, and the dwell was constant, telling me that there's no need for a new bushing at this time.









Back to Top
hooptytank View Drop Down
Member
Member


Joined: 12 Feb. 2012
Location: Santa Monica,CA
Status: Offline
Points: 22
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote hooptytank Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 Feb. 2012 at 4:25pm
This project was a good reason to invest in a sandblast cabinet. got the Harbor Freight floorstanding cabinet and 90lb of aluminum oxide media. there are some things that these units need in order to operate well:
*People don't put a vacuum on them, so they can't see anything once they start blasting.
*The protective sheets for the  glass have to be taped sealed so sand doesn't get between the sheet and the glass.
*Using aluminum oxide media eats ceramic tips fast, so then the compressor is overworked. I have a 26 gal twin cyl husky and it can't keep up but does the job. I'll look into replacing the gun so I can use tungsten tips. More expensive, but last much longer.
*air water separator must be used, and a lot of vertical air line runs to prevent moisture at the gun

I built a cyclonic dust separator for mine so the vacuum doesn't suck blast media and plug the filter. I used the info from http://billpentz.com/woodworking/cyclone/BuildCyclone.cfm There is a spreadsheet on the site, that will give you build plans for the amount of suction power you have available. It's intended for large vacuums in woodworking shops. for a shop vac the unit is only 6" in diameter and 3 feet tall with a 2 gallon bucket attached. It does a great job of separating large particles from ultra fine dust. I only had to clean the vacuum once during a combined 15 hours or so of blasting

Word of advice: Never, ever sandblast internal engine or trans parts that come in contact with oil. The beads embed themselves in the porous metal and are released after some heat cycles and being in oil. you don't want that stuff floating around.







Once I had this set up and working, I wanted to sandblast all sorts of stuff unrelated to this project.

Now on to some trans and t-case building.



Edited by hooptytank - 12 Feb. 2012 at 4:33pm
Back to Top
hooptytank View Drop Down
Member
Member


Joined: 12 Feb. 2012
Location: Santa Monica,CA
Status: Offline
Points: 22
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote hooptytank Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 Feb. 2012 at 5:45pm
I decided to tear down the trans and t-case at the same time. Sane and rational people will choose to tackle one at a time. I had ordered a manual from the Achelon press, AKA Dunn Street Books before Xmas, and received it after the drivetrain was installed in the chassis. Go figure. They did include a copy of the owners manual free, to compensate for the delay. The book is a nice spiral bound copy, can be found here: http://www.acheronpress.com/dsb/cj2a/CJ2A.htm

So I was pressed for time, and left myself at the mercy of the internet. some invaluable resources for this job were:

http://www.willystech.com/wt/T90RebuildGuide/T90rebuild.htm
and
http://www.willystech.com/wt/Model18TCase/Model18TransferCase.html

I used parts from Herm the OD guy. got the master rebuild kits, clutch and PP and pilot bushing, a new 2nd gear and a 2-3 synchro set. Shipping was fast, The parts seemed ok and some fit, the clutch was a 8" model used for I don't know what so that had to be exchanged, the pilot bushing fell right through the flywheel .

I will reserve my rant about the quality and fitment of some aftermarket parts in general from the 3 vendors I used, QTM on ebay, Walcks and Herm for these jeeps somewhere later in the post. Granted they were all helpful in resolving issues and answering questions, providing guidance, etc., I just didn't expect the issues I encountered.

teardown:





Some parts tried to escape at some point during its life, leaving this behind. heated with torch and cleaned with brake cleaner, ground it out a bit, then JB welded inside and out.









I had already spent about an hour cleaning the gunk off the trans and t-case, purple power, pressure washer, scrapes and wire brushes. It still looked like the above picture...



Keep track of all the shims, washers and snap rings go. Pictures, pictures,

Cleaned and painted parts, since it was cold, I decided to help the paint cure faster



In rebuilding we used the above mentioned links and an exploded parts diagram





I decided to test out my safety wire skills, even though I used loctite on the bolts, only to cut it all off because I didn't install the parking brake belcrank arm before the plate. Take notes!!! with the arm in place, I was able to do a good safety wire job with my previous practice...









next up, the trans, remember, its always better to chase all threads, before cleaning. I like to do things backwards for some reason. A good tread chasing set is invaluable when working on these old buckets. a tap or die, bay cut the thread too much, leaving it weaker.



I read on the above link to make all sorts of tools and wooden dowels to help assembly. I used "transjel", a super sticky grease used for assembling transmissions, that melts at a real low temp and dissolves in the oil. it did a perfect job of holding the 6,274 needle bearings that the cluster gear shaft has. use the shaft to stack the bearings and shims with grease, then slide them in, pull the shaft out, drop cluster in case, add shims and shaft, almost done.

















Ready for reassembly. Now this post is not really in true chronological order, but I'm trying to write it in groups. Between building the t-case and trans, I tore into the motor, put it back together and waited to build the trans so I could use the stupid input shaft as an alignment tool for the clutch. of the 5 or so clutches I've installed in my lifetime, they all came with a little plastic alignment tool. not this one. and none that I had worked for this combo. I know I could have used a bolt and some tape, or something along those lines, but I hate struggling to mate a trans to a misaligned clutch disk. More on the engine later, but now I need to go work on the Jeep, instead of burning daylight.



v








Edited by hooptytank - 12 Feb. 2012 at 6:14pm
Back to Top
hooptytank View Drop Down
Member
Member


Joined: 12 Feb. 2012
Location: Santa Monica,CA
Status: Offline
Points: 22
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote hooptytank Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 Feb. 2012 at 1:25am
Before building the trans I tore the engine apart. I had a few restless nights and I'd kick myself if the engine would start leaking once it was installed. Basically a teardown, inspection and reassembly with new seals and gaskets.

I found a rebuilt tag riveted by the right lower bell housing boss, and stamped with the specs. Bore .060, mains .020, rods .010 . It was built by the "Dura-Built engine co." in Los Angeles. That rebuilder I think is long gone.


 
Above, surprise! the cam gear teeth starting to go.
Below, years of sludge buildup probably due to the blocked PCV valve





Above, checked all valves for cracks or other problems, and gave them a quick lapping in their respective seats. The guides were on the loose side, but for now they'll be fine
Below, plasti-gaged all bearings, had about .0025 oil clearance. Perfect for some 20W-50





Above, block cleaned, ready for reassembly.
Below, the block looks like it was used as a dragging anchor sometime in its life. I used a fine file to "hand mill" the deck as best I could. at some prior reduild several cracks were repaired using lock-n-stitch, thankfully I didn't see any new ones. cutting the deck was out of the question for time sake and most importantly that this jeep is titled on the engine serial, which would be destroyed in the process, causing me more problems down the road





ROPE SEAL!!!! the only way to build these. like an idiot I ordered a gasket kit from Walcks. I could have gone to my local parts store about a mile down the road and ordered a Fel pro kit, but no, I used some no name, offshore made kit. It included the infamous Victor style rear mains. The head gasket looks like its made from recycled soda cartons.

Like many have experienced, it locked my crank up so tight, that it took more effort to spin the crank alone, than the assembled engine with the plugs in!! WTF? how do people continue to sell this crap. When I pulled it apart the seal was crushed and caved in onto the crank. the 2 halves are way too long to fit into block, or the main cap, an protrude a good 1/16 on either end.
I went to the store and got a brand new rope rear main seal, made by fel pro, stuffed it in, lubed it up and guess what, the crank spins easily

Also the 2 packing seals were about 1/16" different in thickness. Really? the block has even sized holes. I'd figure both would be too small, or too big, but not different like this.


Back to Top
hooptytank View Drop Down
Member
Member


Joined: 12 Feb. 2012
Location: Santa Monica,CA
Status: Offline
Points: 22
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote hooptytank Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 Feb. 2012 at 2:17am
With the engine assembled I put the clutch and pressure plate on, so I could assemble the trans.



Trans assembled ready to bolt on



Bellhousing had a nasty crack that I had a buddy with voodoo cast iron welding skills zap up for me. He bolted it to a flat table, to keep it from warping, put the whole thing in an oven, used some high nickel content rod and went to town. Time will tell if this worked. Wonder why it cracked in the 1st place, only thing I noticed was that only 1 bolt was holding the inspection cover on. maybe that cover becomes a structural member when bolted down?



The mysterious dowel bolts.



used some white paint to make the markings stand out better. Keep in mind that the flywheel can be mounted in 2 positions, but only one is right, or your markings will be 180 degrees off. http://www.cj-2a.com/oldsite/techtips/alignmarks/index.html



Bellhousing and starter mounted. at this point you're probably wondering why the head is not on. I'm waiting for some ARP head studs to arrive. are they needed? NO. Do they look sweet and cost me the same as the replacement studs from India? heck YES



put some "Right Stuff" around the bolts that I believe will give me problems as well as the cluster shaft. The throw out pivot has Moly lube on it



Trans bolted on



T-case bolted on. Out of the 5 bolts, there's a short bolt that needs to go by the reverse idler or you'll have problems. Bolted on the input gear, cover on, and ready to go. Pops and the dog supervising the operation



Studs finally arrived, the head is back from surfacing(it was way worse than the deck) covered the recycled soda can box in copper gasket sealer (along with the valves and bores).



head torqued on. Look at those sexy nuts LOL



prepping the mounts: the old mounts had a metal plate tack welded to them, the new ones did not. I believe the old mounts to be original, so I cut those plates off and attached them to the new mounts





All I need to do now is drop it on the chassis. The chassis, coming up next.

v
Back to Top
hooptytank View Drop Down
Member
Member


Joined: 12 Feb. 2012
Location: Santa Monica,CA
Status: Offline
Points: 22
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote hooptytank Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 Feb. 2012 at 3:09am
Some steering components to start. wanted to rebuild the steering box. The parts I received were garbage. The new races had these machining ridges in them that must have been .005 deep. no way I was using these as in 100 miles when the ridges wore down I'd have all kinds of slop in the worm shaft. All I used from the kit was the sector shaft seal. old bearings and races looked ok, I just took out a .003 shim from the original stack to tighten things up. The gearbox will be installed with the body to ease alignment.



I removed the steering tube bearing, cleaned it and packed it with grease.



the draglink repair kit was another disaster. The new races or bushings or pills, or whatever they are called, looks like they were made on the same junk equipment as the steering box bearing races. additionally, these had a raised point in the valley of the concave portion, so your bellcrank or sector shaft balls will be riding on spikes, instead of a smooth concave surface. Nothing from this kit was used, not even the "seals" which are actually cardboard, not rubber. made my own from an old inner tube.



Take a box of pained suspension parts, covered in a film of former rusty parts wire wheel dust,



Add a frame and a couple of axles



Some clean shakcles with new heater hose "seals"



and you have a rolling chassis cocktail! Enjoy responsibly.



You may notice the tie rod is a one piece deal, it's the same as on more modern 4x4 trucks and reduces or eliminates the death wobble, now you only need to live with bump steer...

I'm going to cover installing the new bellcrank pin, another marvel of Indian and Chinese engineering. While the diameter the bearings ride on is .750" as it should be, the locking pin groove is .032 shallower than the original, so the locking pin will not go through both holes in the frame. That is 1/16" ! how can you machine something so far off from original and call it good?
Took a cutoff wheel and ground down some, then used a small file to finish it smooth. At least the bearings were genuine Torrington bearings, But I don't feel right about this pin situation.





Going to be reusing the vintage Rod Hall edition Rancho 5000. For those of you that aren't familiar with Rod Hall, he's a Baja racing legend, sort of. He's competed in every single Baja 1000 since 1967 or 68 and in the last few years he was competing against a team I work with. It was somewhat ironic to find these, but the white paint has got to go, and so will the stickers. Sorry Rod.





Continuing on, add master cylinder, and some pedals. Look! on the battery tray, a calibrated breaker bar!LOL



To eliminate the brake pulling I mentioned earlier, I decided to fabricate all new hard and soft brake lines. Some plumbing pictures for your pleasure:









Here you see me practicing the double flare technique. I didn't like it so I cut that off then re-flare. The 2nd time around, i put the nut on before flaring...Clap



Right rear



Right front



Left rear


 
and finally the long line to the back. for this I needed 64" of tube but I didn't realize this until all other lines were done. I bought a couple of 3, 4 and 5 foot sections to do everything, thinking the 5 footer is long enough. Now I'm faced with coupling 2 lines together or buying a 25 foot roll Since 5 is the longest premade length available. couplings = chance for leaks so I bought a 25 foot roll and now I have 19 feet and some odd inches left for the next project. If you're going to do his, buy the roll and the tube nuts and go to town.



v


Edited by hooptytank - 13 Feb. 2012 at 4:56am
Back to Top
hooptytank View Drop Down
Member
Member


Joined: 12 Feb. 2012
Location: Santa Monica,CA
Status: Offline
Points: 22
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote hooptytank Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 Feb. 2012 at 3:47am
With the chassis rolling, and brake plumbing mostly out of the way, time to drop the powertrain in and start the reconstruction of the chassis. then the body work shall commence.



Engine stay cable, or whatever it's called. I've read all kinds of arguments about its' intendend function. I'll go with the reduce clutch chatter theory, due to the clutch linkage relationship to the trans on this truck. End of story, I'm sticking to it.







Assembly line nut thread chasing. These are the u-joint nuts








I also disassembled the driveshafts, including the u-joints to clean, inspect and prep for paint. I believe these to be the original ones, with cork gaskets for the cups and are stamped "SPICER USA" on the caps. all were in great condition.





I had to drill and tap the starter support out to 3/8, since the old hole had no threads left to chase







Critical ground strap



I found the original battery ground cable stuffed in the corner with a rats nest, cleaned up with a new bolt and ready to go!



Dist all cleaned up, sporting an auto-lite cap. is it possible this is original? the spark plug wires were solid core, so who knows when this got it's last tuneup.



Making new AN -4 oil lines to compliment the ARP studs.



I routed the feed side under the water pump for better fit with the stainless hose. also put on a -6 cap for the block drain.



Hope it clears the fuel pump



Some minor trimming required, but it fits.



Made a new alternator bracket from one I had from something else to replace the POs monstrosity. I think one of the two brackets is the original generator bracket...



Dinner's ready, the VHT manifold paint calls for a curing process of multiple heating and cooling cycles.



PCV valve plumbed, carb installed and plumbed



Recored radiator installed. I added a filter to catch all the scale floating around in the block that I couldn't remove. that will come off after a few water changes.



I had remnants from a MSD wire set and plenty of connectors, so why not? New wires on the way



finished and looking good from something I was about to throw away. The air filter bracket had to be drilled out 1/4 " bigger and a new grommet installed to fit the 8.5mm wires. This will easily gain me 0.6 horsepower. also check out the starter solenoid mounting. I used 3/8 copper tube, beat it flat drilled some holes, made some bends and covered some of the exposed metal with shrink wrap. Finally I chose to mount the coil on the engine instead of under the dash, to help clean up some clutter.





V










Edited by hooptytank - 13 Feb. 2012 at 4:28am
Back to Top
hooptytank View Drop Down
Member
Member


Joined: 12 Feb. 2012
Location: Santa Monica,CA
Status: Offline
Points: 22
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote hooptytank Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 Feb. 2012 at 5:05am
I'd like to report that we drove it today, technically yesterday, for the 1st time since the teardown began, without any surprises. It's been exactly 2 months since we bought it and about 6 weeks in the build process, way past deadline and over budget. Cool

Feel free to chime in opinions, questions, suggestions and whatever else you feel like.
Back to Top
Joe DeYoung View Drop Down
Member
Member
Avatar
Sponsor Member x 2

Joined: 20 July 2005
Location: Madison WI
Status: Online
Points: 2685
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Joe DeYoung Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 Feb. 2012 at 6:37am

Nice build thread Love all the pics. That's a lot accomplished in 6 weeks. Clap 

Joe DeYoung
to many jeeps, parts, and accessories to list here, but apparently enough to keep me in trouble with my wife.





Back to Top
Oilleaker1 View Drop Down
Member
Member


Joined: 06 Sep. 2011
Location: Black Hills, SD
Status: Offline
Points: 3930
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Oilleaker1 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 Feb. 2012 at 8:12am
Great story and pictures. The only thing that bothered me was the picture of the spin on oil filter. You say you have driven it. Did the oil pressure look good? Add-on spin- on oil filter assemblies don't usually have the orifice to provide resistence that maintains oil pressure. The old canister stem that the cartridge slides down on has this orifice in the side that I'm talking about. This orifice, the inner plugs, and front oil sprayer for the gears are important for oil pressure.  The picture up high on the bluff was fantastic also! John
Green Disease, Jeeps, Old Iron!
Back to Top
hooptytank View Drop Down
Member
Member


Joined: 12 Feb. 2012
Location: Santa Monica,CA
Status: Offline
Points: 22
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote hooptytank Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 Feb. 2012 at 2:31pm
Thanks for the compliments, it's been a steep yet fun learning curve.

Originally posted by Oilleaker1 Oilleaker1 wrote:

The only thing that bothered me was the picture of the spin on oil filter. You say you have driven it. Did the oil pressure look good? Add-on spin- on oil filter assemblies don't usually have the orifice to provide resistence that maintains oil pressure.


The oil filter is a Napa 1050, bypass type oil filter. Check out that restrictor plate, tiny little hole. The oil pressure is 15 at a hot idle and goes up from there. The PO actually told me about it.



I wanted to make the engine a full flow system, drill and tap the block and oil pump on the outlet side, and block off the inner passage, and run -6 hoses. Someone on another forum did it, here's the link: http://www.earlycj5.com/forums/showthread.php?68239-full-flow-oil-filter-for-f-134. This would have accomplished 2 positive things in my opinion:
*efficiently filter all the oil before it reaches the main oil galley
*eliminate the oil pressure drop at the #1 main

In the end decided to leave well enough alone.



Edited by hooptytank - 13 Feb. 2012 at 3:51pm
Back to Top
hooptytank View Drop Down
Member
Member


Joined: 12 Feb. 2012
Location: Santa Monica,CA
Status: Offline
Points: 22
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote hooptytank Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 Feb. 2012 at 3:49pm
Hammer time! not some 90's rap song, but time to bang out some dents. The body was fairly straight and had little rust compared to some other peoples projects on this forum. I dislike doing body work with a passion, yet every second I reminded myself of the hundreds of CJ2A owners that need to deal with rotted out panels and months or years of work to get them to proper condition. I salute you gents! One user, I forget his name mentioned that he removed 2 or 3 layers of various sheetmetal in search of the original bed floor, and in the end had a very nice view of the ground. That is classic.

Like I mentioned before, We took the body back from the body shop that sat on it, doing nothing. The thing that angered me the most is that the body had just been blasted, and etch primed. It already was starting to show surface rust. With the body safe at home out of their hands, for around 60 bucks at HF I became a body man.



First order of business was to fill in holes, patch up some small sections, remove the top bow storage and mounts, and beat the 2 inch deep valley in the bed floor somewhat straight.



above: Nice hidden rust behind those rear bow brackets. The pieces I took off are in great shape, and kept them, I might sell them off if there's interest.
Below. I guess the original heater knockouts weren't enough for, had to go and drill another hole...







For the sunk bed floor, I had to do a lot of metal shrinking using heat, repeated blows with a 4 lb sledge and rapid cooling, I worked from the outsides to the center. To do this properly you need an Oxy acetylene torch, but all I had was propane.  I would heat a section, then strike a piece of 3x3/8 cold rolled flat stock in various positions to persuade it back to it's original shape, then cool with a wet rag, repeat for a few hours. I concentrated on beating the backside of the ribs, and the flat sections followed. Then a body hammer and dolly to remove some of the remaining dings. It is far from perfect, but it could have been done perfect. It's much better than before. I also used this shrinking method on a couple of high spots on the tub panels.



used 3/4 of a gal of filler on the body, but about 5/8 of it was sanded off. The panels were very straight for it's age.





Paint booth set up and ready for primer





It's like a member of the family, even gets it own room



I used this vintage gun to shoot the primer as it had a large orifice. the parts list is dated Dec 1950! But I think I was the first to ever use it!



Sanded the primer with 180, 220, and 320 dry. Here I want to chime in on sandpaper. 3M products are worth their price. Paint booth obstacle course, this was too many and too close together. It turned out OK though







Almost there



For the paint I used Kustom Shop Hot Rod Flats Olive Drab 235. It painted ok, but now that it's dry it seems like its easily scratched. not sure if I didn't mix it right or what, but the surface prep was perfect. Time will tell

Mounted up some data plates and prepping to drop onto the chassis.





This is how I dealt with the steering box, Insert through hole, and laid it on the floor until the body was installed.



Almost forgot some safety wire



Some protection against scratches



At this point the engine has been ran, brakes, bled, shifted through all the gears and 4wd ranges. I also ran new wires to the brake light. Next is a one man operation of dropping the tub on the chassis.LOL actually 3 is a good number, not too many to make it confusing, not too few to make it cumbersome.



Later on will cover electrical and final assembly



Back to Top
 Post Reply Post Reply Page  12>
  Share Topic   

Forum Jump Forum Permissions View Drop Down

Forum Software by Web Wiz Forums® version 12.03
Copyright ©2001-2019 Web Wiz Ltd.