Forum Home Forum Home > CJ-2A Discussion Area > How to information
  New Posts New Posts RSS Feed - Body Shop Tips & Tricks
  FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Events   Register Register  Login Login

Body Shop Tips & Tricks

 Post Reply Post Reply Page  <1 678
Author
Message
otto View Drop Down
Member
Member
Avatar

Joined: 26 Feb. 2012
Location: Orygun
Status: Offline
Points: 1700
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote otto Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 June 2022 at 9:12pm
Originally posted by berettajeep berettajeep wrote:

Originally posted by otto otto wrote:

I always feel dirty after going to that store. This will be the last time, I swear.



 LOL  They just opened a new one near me very recently and I felt dirty as soon as I walked through the door. They were only opened one day when I went. Confused

I'm sure that store will do well up there; I don't know many places to buy tools in town.
47 CJ2A w/fuel injected boat engine
48 CJ2A
64 Ford Econoline Travelwagon
If you can't get there in a Jeep, get a motorcycle!
Back to Top
sandusky View Drop Down
Member
Member


Joined: 19 Sep. 2010
Location: S.E. Iowa
Status: Offline
Points: 1638
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote sandusky Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23 June 2022 at 11:04pm
Im using a Cardboard Fright HVLP GUN.I’m just jumping in here and really haven’t read the entire thread. I’m not a painter! I do use the proper primers and sand between coats🙄. I use a single stage Nason primer and paint. Because it’s readily available. I find that after I paint and it dries/hardens overnight I put it out in my Solar Curing Booth😉. A day or so later I always have sanding scratches show through. I scuff everything down again and reshoot. As I said I’m no painter but the results seem ok too me. I’m sure a 2 stage base clear would save me but I’m not up too speed on that🤔please delete if of no merit

Edited by sandusky - 23 June 2022 at 11:06pm
Back to Top
otto View Drop Down
Member
Member
Avatar

Joined: 26 Feb. 2012
Location: Orygun
Status: Offline
Points: 1700
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote otto Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24 June 2022 at 12:25am
Originally posted by sandusky sandusky wrote:

Im using a Cardboard Fright HVLP GUN.I’m just jumping in here and really haven’t read the entire thread. I’m not a painter! I do use the proper primers and sand between coats🙄. I use a single stage Nason primer and paint. Because it’s readily available. I find that after I paint and it dries/hardens overnight I put it out in my Solar Curing Booth😉. A day or so later I always have sanding scratches show through. I scuff everything down again and reshoot. As I said I’m no painter but the results seem ok too me. I’m sure a 2 stage base clear would save me but I’m not up too speed on that🤔please delete if of no merit

Your solar curing booth is probably doing a great job of evaporating the solvents from the primer and the film will shrink once dry. This is a catalyzed product, yes? 

This is not a bad practice because the paint can only shrink so much, after that it's fairly stable and if cured completely you could block sand to remove the sand scratches- if you put enough primer on.

Edit: my experience with HF's purple gun is that it wouldn't put very much paint out, even after the modification.


Edited by otto - 03 July 2022 at 10:18am
47 CJ2A w/fuel injected boat engine
48 CJ2A
64 Ford Econoline Travelwagon
If you can't get there in a Jeep, get a motorcycle!
Back to Top
otto View Drop Down
Member
Member
Avatar

Joined: 26 Feb. 2012
Location: Orygun
Status: Offline
Points: 1700
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote otto Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25 June 2022 at 8:09pm

I thought I might revisit poly primer a bit because I feel it offers a lot of utility on a restoration type project. I like to use the poly as my first coat of primer over the epoxy primer to take advantage of the high build, ability to fill deep scratches and its “blockability”(if that’s even a word) to fill low spots while you straighten out a panel sanding with a long board- think of it as an extension of your filler work. One of it’s best features is that it doesn’t shrink like other primers because it doesn’t contain a lot of solvents and it’s catalyzed. I can do the bulk of block sanding with the poly, and then cover the poly with regular 2K type primer for lighter build block sanding or a final prime that will be wet sanded.


The $40 2.5mm primer gun from the internet turned out to be a disappointment, but will get the product on the panel. I don’t know how many times I need to learn this lesson, but like I said, this won’t get used everyday so… whatever.


A fresh stick of 80 grit on the long board works well to cut through the poly and guide coat to show where the panel is high/low. Keep an eye out for where primer is getting thin, that’s a high spot and use that as a guide to start slowing down in that area & shift to spots where you are low. The guide coat will show you the lows- transition to the lows and keep sanding until you are either to the primer or the lows go away. 

This occurred on the hood and because there was plenty of primer, it straightened up well. There is still a bit of a low in one spot, so I’ll put some more poly on and do this again.






Edited by otto - 03 July 2022 at 9:49pm
47 CJ2A w/fuel injected boat engine
48 CJ2A
64 Ford Econoline Travelwagon
If you can't get there in a Jeep, get a motorcycle!
Back to Top
19Cargo42 View Drop Down
Member
Member
Avatar

Joined: 23 Apr. 2018
Location: Becket, MA
Status: Offline
Points: 480
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote 19Cargo42 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25 June 2022 at 8:58pm
Thanks for keeping this thread going. I enjoy following it.

John
Back to Top
otto View Drop Down
Member
Member
Avatar

Joined: 26 Feb. 2012
Location: Orygun
Status: Offline
Points: 1700
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote otto Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 July 2022 at 12:11am
Originally posted by 19Cargo42 19Cargo42 wrote:

Thanks for keeping this thread going. I enjoy following it.

John

Thanks for reading and following along, I hope it's helpful.

If you’re still convinced your prep is good enough and you’re ready to spray, proceed. If you’re blessed and have a paint booth to work in, all the better. Most of us don’t have a booth and will end up spraying in a garage, barn, carport, under the stars, etc. There is a little strategy when staging your project in your painting facility. You want to work towards the exhaust fan when spraying paint so that the overspray doesn’t drift over fresh wet paint. If painting a disassembled jeep with all the parts scattered around your space, keep this in mind. 


Another tip for spraying in the “booth”: because of my advanced years and poor vision, I need to wear glasses to see anything. When I’m spraying, I wear a pair of cheap reading glasses to not trash my prescription specs. Spraying paint in a confined space creates a fine mist that sticks to everything, particularly my glasses- especially enamel. I’ve found that applying car wax to the lenses makes the paint fog easier to wipe off. It still sticks to the glasses, but it’s easier to clean off while you’re spraying.

 

Wear a good respirator, don’t skimp on this. They’re only good for 40 hours of exposure once you take them out of the package so don’t use the one from last year, it won’t protect you. If you have facial hair, the respirator won’t seal. Wear a painter’s sock over your head to keep hair out of your paint and paint out of your hair, especially spraying enamel- it’s better than hairspray!

 

I also wear a Tyvec paper suit over my clothes for spraying; it will keep you clean and dust & lint on you, from landing in your fresh paint.


47 CJ2A w/fuel injected boat engine
48 CJ2A
64 Ford Econoline Travelwagon
If you can't get there in a Jeep, get a motorcycle!
Back to Top
otto View Drop Down
Member
Member
Avatar

Joined: 26 Feb. 2012
Location: Orygun
Status: Offline
Points: 1700
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote otto Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 July 2022 at 10:15pm

Finish Coats


A little trip down memory lane to give readers perspective for where I'm coming from and my past experience painting vehicles.  Most of the finish coatings that I am most familiar with are relics of the past and not available any more. When I started working in body shops we did spot repairs with acrylic lacquer and larger paint jobs were generally done in acrylic enamel or the first generation of urethanes. My favorite paint was Dupont’s Centari acrylic enamel. I had(have) a Bink’s Model 7 that was set up for enamel and it put out enough material to paint a house! I seemed to have a knack for spraying Centari and could get it to go on like glass if all the planets lined up. It was glorious stuff. 


Urethanes were just emerging as the next big thing and most of the shops I worked in shifted to using PPG’s Deltron. I hated it. Didn’t like how it sprayed, or smelled, and it didn’t seem to shine very well without a lot of buffing. Spraying enamel required a “feel” for how it would flow out after it was on the car and too little meant dry spray and no shine, vs. too much and…runs! Deltron was just weird and seemed to have a mind of its own. There was some inconsistency with it early on. I only painted for a paycheck in one shop where I did both body & paint and after that, spent the rest of that career on the body side. 


At the shop where I worked jobs from start to finish, because I was the newby, I got all the s#$t jobs. Looking back, it was pretty good training for a variety of skills. It was a car dealership where they also sold motorhomes and because I was said newby, those jobs came my way. The motorhomes did not have paint codes and you had to bench mix every color on them. After a while I got fairly adept at matching color by eye, but a lot of paint was also tossed in the process.


Also, motorhomes are the most horribly built vehicles I’ve ever seen! 


47 CJ2A w/fuel injected boat engine
48 CJ2A
64 Ford Econoline Travelwagon
If you can't get there in a Jeep, get a motorcycle!
Back to Top
nofender View Drop Down
Member
Member
Avatar
Sponsor Member x 3

Joined: 10 May 2016
Location: Maryland
Status: Offline
Points: 1723
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote nofender Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06 July 2022 at 5:27am
just a great informative thread. Thank you!
46 CJ2a rockcrawler
46 CJ2a - 26819
47 Bantam T3C - 11800
68-ish CJ5
Back to Top
otto View Drop Down
Member
Member
Avatar

Joined: 26 Feb. 2012
Location: Orygun
Status: Offline
Points: 1700
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote otto Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06 July 2022 at 2:27pm
Originally posted by nofender nofender wrote:

just a great informative thread. Thank you!

Thanks, glad to see some are following along and hopefully getting something out of this- it's therapeutic for me too!

The previous post made me think of something related to tinting paint. I was going to repaint one of the vintage Datsun trucks that I owned at the time, and ordered a gallon of Dupont Centari from our shop’s supplier. They sent out the paint mixed to the code on the truck for that year. It was a turquoise color and when I opened the can I wasn't super impressed with the color, it looked too green for my tastes. I asked the painter about this and he said, “put some red in it, red kills green”. This seemed crazy, but I tried it with some leftover paint in the store room and it worked! I don’t know how, but it took a lot of the green away and left me with a sort of lighter blue which was more palatable.


Photo c. 1986






d
47 CJ2A w/fuel injected boat engine
48 CJ2A
64 Ford Econoline Travelwagon
If you can't get there in a Jeep, get a motorcycle!
Back to Top
Scratch View Drop Down
Member
Member
Avatar

Joined: 30 July 2019
Location: Hudson, WI
Status: Online
Points: 746
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Scratch Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06 July 2022 at 6:11pm
Thanks for your work on this thread.  I went to auto body school just out of high school, graduated and worked in two shops for almost 10 years before I switched careers.  But that was like 20 years and a brain injury ago so I don’t remember everything, plus it’s nice to hear about new things and methods.

You keep posting, we’ll keep reading!
43 GPW 93487 Blk
44 GPW 230283 OD
46 CJ2A 48990 Blk
46 CJ2A 77632 Wht
47 CJ2A 141681 Grn
48 CJ2A 156240 Red/Yel
48 CJ2A "Lefty" 181341 Red
61 CJ5 123120 Tan
76 CJ7 Camo
03 TJ Inca Gld
Back to Top
otto View Drop Down
Member
Member
Avatar

Joined: 26 Feb. 2012
Location: Orygun
Status: Offline
Points: 1700
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote otto Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 July 2022 at 6:06pm
Originally posted by Scratch Scratch wrote:

Thanks for your work on this thread.  I went to auto body school just out of high school, graduated and worked in two shops for almost 10 years before I switched careers.  But that was like 20 years and a brain injury ago so I don’t remember everything, plus it’s nice to hear about new things and methods.

You keep posting, we’ll keep reading!

Scratch,

It sounds like our younger days led us both down similar paths. I too went to body shop school right after high school and worked in a number of shops for about 13 years before I smartened up and went back to school. Guess it wasn't all bad- it bought me a house and taught me some valuable time management skills.

Thanks for reading!
47 CJ2A w/fuel injected boat engine
48 CJ2A
64 Ford Econoline Travelwagon
If you can't get there in a Jeep, get a motorcycle!
Back to Top
otto View Drop Down
Member
Member
Avatar

Joined: 26 Feb. 2012
Location: Orygun
Status: Offline
Points: 1700
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote otto Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 July 2022 at 6:15pm

Actually spraying the stuff

I’m assuming that folks already know the basics of how to operate a spray gun- pull trigger, stuff comes out, how the knobs work and how they affect the spray pattern, the difference between a single pass and a double coat, so I won’t go into that unless there are questions. It’s OK if you do, not everyone is born knowing this stuff.


Make sure that you get a tech sheet on the products you have chosen to use, especially if this is new to you or you are trying a new product. The manufacturers generally have the most knowledge about them. READ the directions and follow them regarding reductions and mixing, flash times, temperatures and topcoating. Things have changed with how mixing is described by paint manufacturers now with all the different components. With the paints of olde, it was a matter of expressing reduction in percentages, while now it’s parts to other parts and mixing cups with bars on them so you just pour the parts to line up with the bars on the cup. Maybe the math was just too difficult to deal with. 




At first the cups were a bit confusing to me, but then I figured out what all the marks meant and how to use them. What you want to do is find the graph on the cup that corresponds to the reduction of the material you’re using. The numbers on the bars just indicate how much of the individual components you’ll use for a given amount. If it’s a 2:1:10%:, just add material (paint) up to the number you want (say #5) in the 2 column. Then add catalyst up to the 5 in the :1 column, and up to the 5 in the :10% column with reducer. If you want more or less mixed product, follow the bars with a higher or lower number. It’s that simple!


The trick here is to not stir the paint or disturb the level of the contents in the cup until it’s filled up; if you do this, you won’t be able to see the marks, Doh!




Edited by otto - 12 July 2022 at 6:20pm
47 CJ2A w/fuel injected boat engine
48 CJ2A
64 Ford Econoline Travelwagon
If you can't get there in a Jeep, get a motorcycle!
Back to Top
otto View Drop Down
Member
Member
Avatar

Joined: 26 Feb. 2012
Location: Orygun
Status: Offline
Points: 1700
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote otto Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 July 2022 at 8:22pm

I wanted to elaborate on something I may have glossed over, and it came to me during the block sanding process on my project. The point I wanted to make about applying primer and block sanding is: just use the minimal amount needed to make the repair


Spraying a generous amount of primer on the panel is fine, especially if you are trying to fill deep scratches or block a panel straight. With the urethane based, high build primers, you’re going to get a fairly thick coating. Primer guns with larger tip sizes are really the only way to get this material on, and will apply a lot of material quickly. But be aware that just piling up thick coats of primer really don't serve a purpose unless you intend to block them out and may lead to problems long term.


But when sanding primer, you want to sand off most of what was applied leaving just what is needed to correct the defect. A guide coat can help with this so deep scratches and lows are visible where the sandpaper didn’t cut down to the bottom of the scratch or reach the low spot. When you get to the point of sanding underlying layers (epoxy primer, sealer, etc.) and scratches and lows still exist, stop sanding and you can apply more primer. If the scratches are sanded away evenly and no lows are showing, that’s the goal of this step. What I typically do is to keep sanding until all the defects are gone, and then I keep sanding until other layers underneath are just starting to show. If a lot of expensive product ends up on the floor, so be it; that’s what it’s going to take to get things looking good. This is where focusing on getting your body work right will pay dividends during this process. Also if you can wait a few days to block sand, all the better. It will shrink some, so the longer it can cure the less shrinkage you’ll see in your panel.





Edited by otto - 29 July 2022 at 12:54am
47 CJ2A w/fuel injected boat engine
48 CJ2A
64 Ford Econoline Travelwagon
If you can't get there in a Jeep, get a motorcycle!
Back to Top
otto View Drop Down
Member
Member
Avatar

Joined: 26 Feb. 2012
Location: Orygun
Status: Offline
Points: 1700
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote otto Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23 July 2022 at 11:24pm

Sealers


Prior to spraying the finish, it’s important to apply a sealer over your prepped primer. Sealers offer a number of advantages: they help your topcoat adhere, they provide an even, single color under your topcoat, separate the finish from the primer, forming somewhat of a “barrier” between them, and even out the surface to paint onto so it’s consistent. Choose a sealer color that will compliment your paint color and offer good coverage (light colors = light sealer, dark color= dark sealer, etc.). If you aren’t sure what color sealer to use, ask the paint store what they would recommend. It is possible to get away without using a sealer under your paint, but after a while you may see surface prep defects show up in the topcoat from underneath (sanding scratches, crazing, bullseyes, fisheyes, wrinkles, etc.).


In the days of olde, there were single stage sealers that worked great but don’t exist anymore. You would just mix them up, strain into the cup and spray. Dupont Velvaseal was a favorite of mine, it went on smoothly with a uniform, satin sheen ready for the topcoat.


 Epoxy primer can be reduced down and used as a sealer- the same for some primers too. It seems that a lot of today’s products can be reduced with urethane reducer- it’s like a universal solvent. My brother tipped me to using urethane reducer on epoxy primer when using it as a sealer. This worked great to get it to lay down flat and smooth. The directions stated to use acetone @10% which did the opposite- so much for following the manufacturer’s directions to the letter.


I would recommend a thorough look over of your project after you’ve sprayed the sealer but not mixed paint yet. This is the time to notice defects and problems before applying your expensive paint. It doesn’t cost that much to re-seal the car if you spot some areas that escaped earlier inspection and abort applying final finish. If it’s really not ready, don’t spray. 


I should have heeded this advice on my van project, but was in a hurry and paid for it later. The sealer didn’t go on great and wasn’t a perfect base for the paint- I should’ve known better. I found out about the reducer trick after this.


47 CJ2A w/fuel injected boat engine
48 CJ2A
64 Ford Econoline Travelwagon
If you can't get there in a Jeep, get a motorcycle!
Back to Top
drm101 View Drop Down
Member
Member
Avatar

Joined: 12 Dec. 2012
Location: Clarkston, MI
Status: Offline
Points: 1218
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote drm101 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24 July 2022 at 10:41am
Is the poly primer you mentioned polyester? When the body shop painted my '63 Nova, they used a polyester primer after all the body work was done. I'm sure they also used a self etching epoxy on any bare steel, but we did not strip the car to bare metal and it still has most of it's original lacquer paint under the primer. The owner said the polyester will "lock down" everything underneath it and provide a stable surface to apply the final coats of primer. We were both concerned about going over the original lacquer, but he said it will save from having to strip all the old paint from the car. Obviously the right way to do it would be to strip the car, but I've been down that road in the past and never did get all the media and dust out of all the seams. So far, so good. 3 years on it still looks like new. 


Edited by drm101 - 24 July 2022 at 10:52am
Dean
'47 CJ2A "Mud Hen"
The less the Power the More the Force
Back to Top
otto View Drop Down
Member
Member
Avatar

Joined: 26 Feb. 2012
Location: Orygun
Status: Offline
Points: 1700
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote otto Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24 July 2022 at 6:31pm
Yes, poly = polyester. Sorry, should've been more clear with that. 

Your question/comment about lacquer under other finishes is fair- I wouldn't worry a bit about it. If the original paint was in relatively good condition and was adhering well, I would leave it- it's the best substrate you'll find to start from. OE paint is applied at the factory in near laboratory conditions and is a different product from the aftermarket body shop paint we can buy from a paint store; it's far better.

In the old days lacquer primer was all that was used under topcoats and usually was never a problem. Stripping a car to bare metal is not always the best way to go unless there's a good reason to peel all the paint off. Plus, stripping lacquer with chemical stripper is a messy ordeal as paint stripper turns it to a slimy mess. Lacquer was always found on older GM products up into the 70s while Ford and Chrysler vehicles were painted with enamel from the factory.
47 CJ2A w/fuel injected boat engine
48 CJ2A
64 Ford Econoline Travelwagon
If you can't get there in a Jeep, get a motorcycle!
Back to Top
otto View Drop Down
Member
Member
Avatar

Joined: 26 Feb. 2012
Location: Orygun
Status: Offline
Points: 1700
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote otto Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 Aug. 2022 at 11:08pm

Once I’ve gotten everything ready and the paint mixed, car wiped down, and tacked off it’s the point of no return as you can’t pour the catalyzed paint back in the can. Before this phase I’ll wet the floor down with water to prevent dust blowing around while I’m working. Not so much water that you’re dragging the hose through puddles, just enough to dampen the floor- I use a pump-up garden sprayer.


Before actually mixing paint, it might be beneficial to talk about reducers. There are reducers for different painting scenarios depending on what the anticipated ambient temperature of your spraying environment will be. Generally they’re split into low, mid and high temp ranges so it’s pretty simple, just buy a reducer for the temperature you expect to spray in. If you’re not familiar with how these will react, remember that the solvents are formulated at different evaporation rates so that a high temp reducer will evaporate more slowly than a mid-temp or a low temp reducer so the paint has a chance to flow out into a shiny film. Conversely, a low temp reducer will evaporate much faster so the paint won’t run as easily in a low temp situation. I usually use a mid-temp reducer for my summer painting projects and if it gets a little warm, I might use a bit of high temp so the paint will stay wetter longer and flow out better. If it’s forecast to be a really hot day, I’ll just reschedule for a cooler one. I usually get started early in the morning before it gets warm anyway.


 My first pass around the car is to get all the hard to reach areas: rockers, wheel openings, jambs, nooks & crannies, wherever is going to be difficult to spray and get coverage. Once I’ve gotten all of those areas well covered, then I will make a lap around the car with the first coat.


If you’re spraying an assembled vehicle, don’t paint walking around the vehicle in a circle. Doing this, it’s difficult to keep a “wet edge” and when you work back to where you started, it will be difficult to blend in the wet paint with the dry paint and you’ll end up with a dry spot. To avoid this, plan on starting on the end of the vehicle furthest from the exhaust fan and working toward the fan evenly.

 

Example:assuming the car is placed with the fan at the rear, start at the front and spray the front, hood, front fenders, windshield posts, ½ the roof, switch sides and spray the other half of the roof, one side doors, other sides doors, other side ¼ panel, the remaining ¼ panel, trunk and back. This keeps you spraying onto wet paint throughout the coat and not getting into dryer paint. This still applies if you are blessed to be working in a downdraft booth.


47 CJ2A w/fuel injected boat engine
48 CJ2A
64 Ford Econoline Travelwagon
If you can't get there in a Jeep, get a motorcycle!
Back to Top
Scratch View Drop Down
Member
Member
Avatar

Joined: 30 July 2019
Location: Hudson, WI
Status: Online
Points: 746
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Scratch Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06 Aug. 2022 at 4:45pm
Great tips!
43 GPW 93487 Blk
44 GPW 230283 OD
46 CJ2A 48990 Blk
46 CJ2A 77632 Wht
47 CJ2A 141681 Grn
48 CJ2A 156240 Red/Yel
48 CJ2A "Lefty" 181341 Red
61 CJ5 123120 Tan
76 CJ7 Camo
03 TJ Inca Gld
Back to Top
 Post Reply Post Reply Page  <1 678

Forum Jump Forum Permissions View Drop Down

Forum Software by Web Wiz Forums® version 12.05
Copyright ©2001-2022 Web Wiz Ltd.