Forum Home Forum Home > CJ-2A Discussion Area > Tech Questions and Answers
  New Posts New Posts RSS Feed - Getting the Air Out
  FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Events   Register Register  Login Login

Getting the Air Out

 Post Reply Post Reply Page  <12
Author
Message
47 deuce alpha View Drop Down
Member
Member
Avatar

Joined: 06 Aug. 2017
Location: Midland Texas
Status: Offline
Points: 160
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote 47 deuce alpha Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23 May 2019 at 11:14pm
How does gravity bleeding work??? If I open the bleeder valve, the fluid barely trickles out or doesn't come out at all. If I were to pump the brake with the bleeder open, each time I lifted the brake air would be sucked back into the bleeder. [/QUOTE]
Gravity bleeding is simply opening the bleeder valve and letting the brake fluid leak out without any pumping on the brake pedal. Just attach a length of clear tubing onto the bleeder and into a catch bottle and let it flow while keeping the reservoir full. It will be slow on a willys because the reservoir is not positioned much higher, if any, than the wheel cylinders (more height=increased hydrostatic pressure). Any contamination and blockage in the lines will also cause it to be slow. In theory you should be able to bleed all four wheels at the same time.
1947 CJ2A Half the distance takes you twice as long.
Back to Top
47 deuce alpha View Drop Down
Member
Member
Avatar

Joined: 06 Aug. 2017
Location: Midland Texas
Status: Offline
Points: 160
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote 47 deuce alpha Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23 May 2019 at 11:36pm
[QUOTE If I were to pump the brake with the bleeder open, each time I lifted the brake air would be sucked back into the bleeder. [/QUOTE]
This is the second function of the catch bottle. You start out with the catch bottle about 1/2 full +- of brake fluid. with the flexible tubing positioned below the fluid level in the bottle any air bubbles will be pumped into the bottle then rise to the surface. When you lift the brake pedal fluid(not air) from the bottle will be pulled back up into the flex tubing. There's no reason to close the bleeder on each stroke of the brake. Most critical is keeping the reservoir full so you don't get air from the top. I always cut a short piece of wood that I can wedge between the seat and the brake pedal to keep the pedal partially depressed while I close the bleeder valve after the last pump. Some folks recommend putting grease around the threads on the bleeder valve some air won't be pulled in when the bleeder valve is opened.


Edited by 47 deuce alpha - 23 May 2019 at 11:53pm
1947 CJ2A Half the distance takes you twice as long.
Back to Top
cal.bar View Drop Down
Member
Member


Joined: 09 Sep. 2016
Location: So. Cal.
Status: Offline
Points: 600
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote cal.bar Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24 May 2019 at 12:22am
Originally posted by Ol' Unreliable Ol' Unreliable wrote:

Have you ever seen the "one-man" bleeder screws with the little check valve in them?  You can crack open the bleeder screw and just pump the brake pedal until the fluid is clean or bubbles are gone, whichever.  The check valve keeps air from getting in when you let off the pedal.  You still need to keep an eye on the MC level.  When you're done you just tighten the bleeder screw and go...and stop.  That's if you can find the screws, that is.  I have no idea where or if they're still available.



Are these what you are referring to?

https://www.amazon.com/RUSSELL-639530-Russell-Speed-Bleeder/dp/B000CPJI1U/ref=cm_cr_arp_d_product_top?ie=UTF8
Back to Top
Red Willy View Drop Down
Member
Member


Joined: 18 Mar. 2014
Location: Lake Villa IL
Status: Offline
Points: 476
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Red Willy Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24 May 2019 at 11:01am
Originally posted by cal.bar cal.bar wrote:

Originally posted by Red Willy Red Willy wrote:

Keep in mind, if you pump the pedal to fast you will aerate the fluid. Slow steady pumps until you feel a pressure build up. I have had good luck with gravity bleeding. Open the the bleeder screw and leave it open until you have a solid flow of brake fluid. Topping off as necessary. Do this with all four cylinders. If that doesn’t get all the air out follow up with the pump and bleed.


How does gravity bleeding work??? If I open the bleeder valve, the fluid barely trickles out or doesn't come out at all. If I were to pump the brake with the bleeder open, each time I lifted the brake air would be sucked back into the bleeder.

Do not touch the brake pedal with the bleeder open for the reason you mentioned. 

If you open the bleeder and fluid does not come out you have major air in the line or a blockage. With all the bleeders closed, pump the pedal to attempt to get pressure. Release the pedal, remove the master cylinder cap and leave it off (reinstall before pumping the pedal), confirm the fluid level and then open the furthest bleeder screw. It may take awhile for fluid to start flowing, especially on the first bleeder. Repeat for all four. This method is not the quickest nor is it the best method, but works well for those that don't have a helper to pump the pedal. 

Glen
49 CJ3A
Back to Top
Ol' Unreliable View Drop Down
Member
Member
Avatar

Joined: 25 Sep. 2016
Location: CO Springs CO
Status: Offline
Points: 3083
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Ol' Unreliable Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25 May 2019 at 2:20pm
Originally posted by cal.bar cal.bar wrote:

Originally posted by Ol' Unreliable Ol' Unreliable wrote:

Have you ever seen the "one-man" bleeder screws with the little check valve in them?  You can crack open the bleeder screw and just pump the brake pedal until the fluid is clean or bubbles are gone, whichever.  The check valve keeps air from getting in when you let off the pedal.  You still need to keep an eye on the MC level.  When you're done you just tighten the bleeder screw and go...and stop.  That's if you can find the screws, that is.  I have no idea where or if they're still available.



Are these what you are referring to?

https://www.amazon.com/RUSSELL-639530-Russell-Speed-Bleeder/dp/B000CPJI1U/ref=cm_cr_arp_d_product_top?ie=UTF8


That is the very thing!  I wonder if they're made for a 2A's wheel cylinders.


Edited by Ol' Unreliable - 25 May 2019 at 2:22pm
There's a reason it's called Ol' Unreliable
Back to Top
cal.bar View Drop Down
Member
Member


Joined: 09 Sep. 2016
Location: So. Cal.
Status: Offline
Points: 600
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote cal.bar Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25 May 2019 at 2:23pm
Originally posted by Ol' Unreliable Ol' Unreliable wrote:

Have you ever seen the "one-man" bleeder screws with the little check valve in them?  You can crack open the bleeder screw and just pump the brake pedal until the fluid is clean or bubbles are gone, whichever.  The check valve keeps air from getting in when you let off the pedal.  You still need to keep an eye on the MC level.  When you're done you just tighten the bleeder screw and go...and stop.  That's if you can find the screws, that is.  I have no idea where or if they're still available.



I ordered 4 of them on Fri. They Arrived today. And.... NO. they are way too large for the CJ2.
Back to Top
jeepdidwhat View Drop Down
Member
Member


Joined: 20 Feb. 2018
Location: Texas
Status: Offline
Points: 7
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote jeepdidwhat Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26 May 2019 at 9:16am
I ordered my brake speed bleeders from SpeedBleeder: http://speedbleeder.com/
They fit the regular wheel cylinders I got from Walcks, but I do not remember what the thread size is.  Maybe 1/4-28?

Back to Top
 Post Reply Post Reply Page  <12
  Share Topic   

Forum Jump Forum Permissions View Drop Down

Forum Software by Web Wiz Forums® version 12.01
Copyright ©2001-2018 Web Wiz Ltd.