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Nothing Special's '71 Bronco

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Joined: 02 Feb. 2018
Location: Roseville, MN
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Nothing Special Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 Feb. 2021 at 8:19pm
Another small maintenance/repair project completed.  Last fall when I went 'wheeling in Missouri I had a partial power steering pump failure.  I say "partial" because it worked all of the time above about 1500 rpm, but below that every so often the power steering (and power brakes since it's now hydroboost) would suddenly go away.  Kind of exciting when you're idling past a big rock and suddenly need to pull HARD on the steering to keep from veering into it!

So I replaced the power steering pump this weekend.  I borrowed a puller from NAPA to get the  pulley off the old pump and on the new.  That went pretty well.  Took a bit of effort, but everything worked out.  I also had to pull the reservoir off the old pump and put it on the new, but that went easily.

The biggest issue I had was that I had to take the brackets all the way off the engine to get the pump out, and doing that required removing two of the water pump bolts.  While they were out I had a little coolant weeping out of the seam, so I'm afraid I'm going to have a coolant leak there now.  Oh well, that might be a project for this summer.

After getting the fluid flushed and everything buttoned back up I backed the Bronco out of the garage, turned it around and backed it back in.  The next projects require access to the driver's side which I couldn't get at when it was pulled in forward.  The significant thing about that is that I did have a bit of Ford power steering pump whine.  We'll see how that goes once I'm actually driving it.  And the other thing was that it kept dying on me.  Since this was the longest it's run since rebuilding the carb I'm guessing I need to clean or adjust something there.  But it runs like crap any time it's cold, so who knows?  It might be fine once things warm up.
Bob

Flatfender wannabe
'71 Ford Bronco
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Joined: 02 Feb. 2018
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Nothing Special Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 Mar. 2021 at 10:12pm
Another couple of small projects done today.  The shock bushings looked rather suspect when I bought this Bronco back in ~2002.  Overall I don't thing the shocks have improved in the past 19 years!  So I replaced all 4 shocks.

The other thing I did was replace the fuel tank switching valve.  Early Broncos had a dual tank option from the factory, which my Bronco came with.  The factory switching valve was a mechanical valve below the driver's seat, with a switch on the dash to switch which tank would read on the gauge.  Kind of an annoying system, so years ago I replaced the mechanical valve with an electrical one wired to the same switch.  It was nicer just flipping one switch to both change tanks and switch the fuel gauge.  But that valve went flaky on my several years ago, so I replaced it with another electrical valve.  That one started leaking last summer (not dripping on the ground, it would draw some from both tanks no matter what position the switch was in).  So today I went back to the original mechanical valve.  OK, so I have to remember to flip both the valve and the switch.  But at least it should last more than about 10 years.
Bob

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'71 Ford Bronco
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote bight Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 Mar. 2021 at 11:36pm
i dunno, but there was something i really liked about that mechanical switch under the seat. when that weird realization that the engine sputtering was just the need to rotate the switch always made me feel ok. 

i don't recall a gauge switch. i just knew to head for the nearest gas station after switching to the reserve tank.

man, i really was dumb to ever let that '69 get away.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Nothing Special Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 June 2021 at 12:10am
Originally posted by Nothing Special Nothing Special wrote:

....  And at this point I've only done the passenger side, but that's how it's going to stay for a while....   So the driver's side can wait until winter.

Well, I guess "winter" meant May and June.  I had intended to get the driver's side rock rail done before the trip we took to Moab in early May, but that didn't happen.  However it's done now!

I got started in late May.  Here's the "before" picture to show the starting point:


Having done the passenger's side a year ago I had more confidence (as well as a complete plan!) as I started cutting, so I got to this point within the first day:


I did find a little more rot on this side than the passenger's side, including the license plate that I thought was welded up under the front fender.  Turned out it wasn't welded in, it was sort of stuck in with some sort of goop that was holding quite a bit of moisture.  So as fun as it was to have that bit of "character", it's gone now.  Anyway, the rust wasn't bad enough to make me change the plans.


A few more days of work and I had the tube cut, the plates welded in the top (to bolt the front and rear fenders to the tube) and the rash rail welded on.



Things slowed down for a bit then as life got in the way for a week or so.  But then I was able to fit in a long evening of work on it.  Not a lot of visible progress that night, but a lot of progress none the less as I got the cap on the front of the tube )(picture below) and some welds ground down (no pictures of that).



Then a long Saturday got a lot more progress with the riser welded to the top of the tube (to "reach up" to the door sill) and the rear end capped:


I also got the holes drilled and tapped to attach the fenders to the tube and to get the fender flare fit back on.  The new rail doesn't hang down quite as far as stock, so the flare has to swing forward a bit to not hang down below the rail.  That required trimming the fender out a bit more.  Anyway, here's the rail fit in place as I was getting everything lined up.


I also got the underside cleaned up and sprayed some weld-thru primer on it that day.  So the next day I got a whole bunch of holes drilled...



... got the tube clamped in place...


... and got it welded on!




A few more evenings of grinding...


... and painting and it's done!



It doesn't look professional, but it looks good and I did it myself, so I'm happy with it!  Now both rockers are done!  Even with the life delays this side took a little under a month, so still quicker than the first side.
Bob

Flatfender wannabe
'71 Ford Bronco
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