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Started Teardown On My Bantam

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    Posted: 24 Apr. 2010 at 11:57pm
I FINALLY got started with the tear down of my Bantam.  Could only spend some hours on it today but it has begun, at least.  Didn't get much accomplished as the wheels were a horse to take off.  Managed to take off all the old wiring, the old tail lights, and reflectors.  In all I would say I spend some time getting to know her as I started taking parts off.  I already know that I'm going to have to do some light welding as the left hinge is rusted out and broken, so new ones have to be put in place.  But that's just half the fun of it.






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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote canorisa Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26 Apr. 2010 at 12:47am
PROGRESS!!!








Wanted to know...Where can I get two sets of U-bolts and two shackles for this Bantam?  Anyone out there have a source for these things?  I'm thinking of NAPA but don't know if they carry the exact same thing.  Any one with cross reference part numbers?  Are the u-bolts and shackles the same as the CJ2A, by any chance?  Please let me know.

U-bolts:


Shackles:


Thanks,

Joel


Edited by canorisa - 26 Apr. 2010 at 12:53am
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote canorisa Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 Apr. 2010 at 3:51pm
Hi all:

I have noticed that some Bantams come with the 10 leaf springs and some come with just 5 leaf springs...like mine.  Are the 5 leaf springs original to the trailer?  When did they change?  Anyone out there with a clue.

Here is a pic of my leaf springs:


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote canorisa Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 Apr. 2010 at 3:37pm
Hello:

Have a question in regards to the safety chains.  I can already tell that these safety chains are going to be too short once I get the trailer restored.  Has anyone out there come up with a solution to this type of problem with their Bantam?  I am considering taking off the original safety chains and put on a pair of M416 safety chains I have laying around.  Still, I would not want to take the originality of the trailer so if anyone else out there has any different ideas, please let me know.  Here is a pic of my original safety chains.



Thanks,

Joel
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote 48cj2a Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 Apr. 2010 at 10:23pm
Joel I'd leave them as is and get a set of some longer ones like the 416 chains and use the threaded chain links to attach when needed with another vehicle. I think they are perfectly fine the way they are with the CJ2A and the drawbar hitch.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote canorisa Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 May 2010 at 8:42pm
FINISHED DISASSEMBLE:

Took off tailgate from tub.  Hinges were in very bad shape.  Will be welding the new ones this weekend.




Bare bones:



Now have to wait till August to take down to the blasters.  VACATION comes first!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote F Bill Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 May 2010 at 10:41pm
If you have a spring shop nearby they should be able to make you a set of new U bolts.
If you haven't checked out the tech FAQ section, go to:
http://www.thecj2apage.com/forums/tech-faq_forum57.html
for a lot of great stuff you need to know!!

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote canorisa Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 May 2010 at 11:26pm
Bill:

Thanks for the tip.  I have already gotten my new u-bolts from Ron F.


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote canorisa Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23 May 2010 at 12:56am
Went ahead and welded the hinges MYSELF this time.  I had a good welder available but rather wanted to give it a shot myself.  I know, it's a bubba job but I don't think it looks that bad.  I had a good teacher next to me telling me what to do the whole time and he told me that I did good...considering that it was my first time and all.  The important thing is that the tailgate opens and closes with no problems and I figure that once the trailer has been blasted and painted those hinges won't be that visible...UNLESS you are really looking at it closely, that is, lol.  I'm planning on having the trailer powder coated cherry red.

Any adivse on this?  Has anyone had their trailer powder coated?  Any likes or dislikes?




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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote ndrtkr Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23 May 2010 at 10:10am
I'm very fortunate also Canorisa, as my best friend is a retired factory welder, who has taught me tons about steel & welding.   There is a certain since of pride looking at a project completed solely on your on.  I know how you feel.  You're right....it is a bubba looking job.  The only thing that matters is "You're satisfied".  I have become a rather accomplished welder, but when I have a welding job on one of my projects that I want to look nice I don't hesitate to call on my buddy!  One thing he has taught me....If you don't like the way it turns out.....take it off an try again.  Just keep that in mind.  A die grinder can clean those edges nicely also. Your project is coming along, keep up the good work.
 
As for powder coating...It's great!  I've had frames pc'd.  The problem with trailer tubs is that unless you're able to hammer out all the blemishes or if you need to use a skim of body filler in an area, it can't be coated.  It has to adhere straight to a metal surface.  If your tub is blemish free, it will work great....very expensive though in comparison to paint.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote F Bill Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23 May 2010 at 10:14am
Smooth those welds out with a flap wheel on a  four inch angle grinder and they will look more factory..
 
As far as powder coat, I have no experience but I would imagine it is likie any paint job, it is what is underneath that is important....so make sure you get it as smooth and dent free as you can because like plating it will only accentuate any imperfections.
 
Supposedly there are fillers that can be used with powder coat...


Edited by F Bill - 23 May 2010 at 10:15am
If you haven't checked out the tech FAQ section, go to:
http://www.thecj2apage.com/forums/tech-faq_forum57.html
for a lot of great stuff you need to know!!

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote canorisa Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23 May 2010 at 11:13am
Ndrtkr:

You are absolutely right about all you said.  There is nothing more satisfying that doing it yourself.  It is a pain though but in the end is the feeling that you have accomplished something.  On the right hinge, I had to actually weld and grind it off, then weld again and grind it off again.  I did that three times because I was not satisfied with the welds I was putting on it.  My good friend and teacher was telling me to take my time and not to be in such a hurry, lol.  But you know how it is when you are learning a new thing.  Next week I will take a grinder and smooth those welds up a bit.

As far as the powder coating goes, I have had small projects done in powder coat.  You know, vintage gas cans and other things and they have come out looking GREAT!  I don't know if you can see from the pictures that I have posted but the tub does not look bad at all.  No dents to speak off.  The only dents that I see is the floor that is a bit wavy but what trailer this old does not have that, right?!

Just one thing I am going to have to fix a little bit and that's the tailgate.  It's a bit bent outwardly.  You know, away from the body of the tub.  But it's not a big job.  Any tips on how to get this done?  I was thinking of hitting it with a hammer but don't want to create any unnecessary dents on it.  All I know is that the right side of the tailgate closes very well and flush to the body of the tub but the left of the tailgate does not.  Well any suggestions will help greatly.

Thanks,

Joel




Edited by canorisa - 23 May 2010 at 7:38pm
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote canorisa Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23 May 2010 at 11:18am
Bill:

Thanks for the tip.  I will be doing just that next week.  The tub does not look bad at all.  Not dents to speak off on the body but the floor is a bit wavy but no dents.  Just two rust out spots by the edge of the tailgate but I took the welder and welded it up while I was doing the hinges.

I will be checking on those fillers you are talking about.  Any idea of where they might be sold at?

Thanks,

Joel
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote F Bill Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23 May 2010 at 1:02pm
No idea on the fillers, I was of the same opinion as the poster who said that you were stuck with whatever dents were on the metal but one of the powder coat afficionados corrected me...You might do a search for "Powder coat tub"  on the forum to find a discussion about powder coating a jeep tub where fillers were mentioned.
If you haven't checked out the tech FAQ section, go to:
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for a lot of great stuff you need to know!!

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote bkreutz Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23 May 2010 at 3:04pm
There are special purpose fillers that you can get from powder coaters or suppliers (Eastwood). But JB Weld works as well (is there no end to it's uses?LOL) The one big requirement for the filler is that it has to be able to handle 450F temps. 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote canorisa Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23 May 2010 at 7:34pm
Bill/Gale:

Thanks for the responses.  I have used JB weld in the past with great success!  I like the product but not sure if it can withstand the 450F temps.  I mean, I don't want to go through the trouble of using the product and then find out that it melted in the oven while powder coating.

So, does anyone out there knows if JB weld can withstand 450f temps?  I would surely like to know.

Thanks Gents,

Joel
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote bkreutz Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23 May 2010 at 7:52pm
I got the info about JB weld from my powdercoater. Haven't tried it myself, you could mix up a blob on a piece of metal, let it cure, then put it in the oven and see if you can get it to melt. (somehow I think it will stand up to the heat). LOL
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote canorisa Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23 May 2010 at 11:34pm
Gale:

Found this info on JB weld on the internet.  According to this info JB weld is good to go for up to 500 degrees F temp.  So I would say it's good to go in an oven while powder coating.

Properties (psi)
Tensile Strength: 3960
Adhesion: 1800
Flex Strength: 7320
Tensile Lap Shear: 1040
Shrinkage: 0.0%
Resistant to: 500° F

Mechanics -- you can use J-B WELD with confidence. It is designed for safe, reliable, permanent repairs in engine compartments and heated environments up to 500° F. It's strong as steel and impervious to water, gasoline, chemicals, and acids. Working with J-B WELD is quick, easy, and convenient -- and saves you time, work, and money!

Not recommended for use on manifolds, exhaust systems, and other engine components which normally operate at temperatures above 500° F.




Edited by canorisa - 24 May 2010 at 12:18am
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