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T-98 / T-18 trans to L134 bellhousing

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Greaser007 View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Greaser007 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: T-98 / T-18 trans to L134 bellhousing
    Posted: 13 Mar. 2019 at 11:37am
Hi y'all I have been wanting to install a T-98 or T-18 transmission with the 6:1 granny gear mated to the L134 Bellhousing / Engine for years.
Life gets in the way all too often, and it is mostly a Dream.

I am going to begin by saying I Did install a T-18 Ford transmission into my '77 CJ-7 in 1984 using a Novak adapter-kit. ($350.00 back then). I still have the transmission in my CJ-7 and it took me into, and back out of the Rubicon trail for 15-summers. (I have been through the Rubicon 18-summers total).

I have NP 435 transmissions in my shop as spares for the one in my '77 F-350.
I have a T-98 transmission from "supposed" '64 Ford F-250 4x4 pickup, and in February 2017 I picked up a Scout T-18 transmission with straight-thru T-case, which must be a Dana 300 ?   
December 2017, I purchased my current '46 Willys CJ2A with L134 engine and T-90 transmission and pretty stock-ish.

   I have found Falcon's T-18 thread very interesting and I like his expertise and vigor in modifying his input shaft to the T-90 spec.
The only thing I don't like about his choice is to have to bolt the L134 Bellhousing directly to the T-18 transmission face.   And I told Falcon I would start My-Own thread to share My ideas of how I may solve the MYSTERY-MATCH.

   BEAR WITH ME PLEASE !

Below is some photos of my T-98 transmission supposedly out of a "64 F-250.
there is a number stamped on the top surface which is "57" and some other numbers.


Front of T-98 showing the large diameter of the input shaft of 1-3/8" approx.


This photo shows the casting number on the side of the T-98


This is a side-shot of the T-98 trans in all of its Glory (they're Tough).


This shows the number stamping in the top surface driver side-rear corner.


This is the transmission face of the Ford GPW L134 Bellhousing showing bolt holes and outline of the mating-surface.


front face showing the early Ford hole pattern and transmission ears.


This paper template shows how the T-98 trans-face overlays the L134 bellhousing face to determine if new mounting Ears would conflict.

Here is my Thoughts for being able to bolt the T-98 directly to the L134 bellhousing:
   I am going to do a "mock-up" of new cardboard 'ears' to be glue-gunned to my L134 bellhousing and then mount it to the mounting face of the T-98 trans.

   The new Re-purposed L134 bellhousing will have new mounting 'ears' fabbed out of 1/2-inch mild steel bar-stock.   These will be bolted to the T-98 then the T-98 will be indexed into the L134 bellhousing with the pilot hole bored out to fit the diameter of the turned-down Ford front-bearing-retainer.
   Once the T-98 box is indexed into the L134 bellhousing with enlarged pilot, then the new 1/2-inch mounting 'ears' will be mig welded to the bellhousing with nickle wire or other as recommended by my local welding supply.
    If I have to I will incorporate a stifferner web from new 'ears' to the bellhousing for much needed additional support.

   I have searched endlessly for the old Optional "mystery-shaft" that would mate the T-98-to-L134 and with the optinal adapter plate and puffy front bearing retainer.   No, I have not found one Yet, and probably never will.

   I commend Herm for supplying a complete kit for this swap, but there are many of us guys who would rather do this on our own, and I will pursue this re-purpose of old parts and pieces to make this work.

   I am not a machinist, and have never operated a Lathe or Mill.
I have spent a life time doing 4-wheel drive conversions of pickups and vans and Toyota and willys power steering cross-overs and lots of mig welding and oxy-acet torch welding.   Very little brazing though, and I would like to be proficient at brazing, but just really haven't had a need.

    Maybe I should be brazing the new transmission 'ears' onto the cast iron bellhousing for the L134, but I do think, and strongly believe that as directed by my old Mentor Machinist of the early '70's, weld in short stitch, then peen while orange to relieve stresses, then continue with short stitch welds, and peening each pass while orange.   It works really !
    And in 40-years of modifying steering components and welding tie-rods and draglinks and pan-hard rods, I have not had any failures yet.
    
    As soon as I get the cardboard "ears" mocked-up onto the L134 Bellhousing, I will attach some photos.

   As Falcon shows in his T-18 / T-90 thread, I find no choice but to have an existing input shaft modified to fit my specs.
   I have not done any critical measuring for exactly what length I will use for my re-purpose idea, but am going to next find me a machinist locally who feels up to the task of turning-down an imput to meet my needs.
   I may have to call Moser to see about spline cutting as did Falcon.

   Don't hold your breath on this because Life gets in the way every-day. :)

   Len
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Greaser007 View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Greaser007 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 Mar. 2019 at 11:58am
Continuing on here:

Below is the tag on the top cover of my T-18 transmission:


This is supposedly a IH Scout transmission / T-case assembly.
I purchased it from a gentleman in Paradise, California before it Burned.


Photo shows the casting numbers on the driver's side of the t-18


casting numbers of the T-18 top cover


my dirty and uncleaned T-18 transmission / Transfer case assembly


T-18 specs for those interested. note these dimensions are a quick measurement and at this point, I am not doing any Fine-to-the-half-thousandth numbers.


T-98 specs for those interested. note these are rough measurements for my use.

   Remember, if Life gets in the way, it may be a good thing for us old-timers to relish each Sunrise regardless of if we accomplish any tasks or not. :)

   Keep those brains turning, and the wheels spinning !

   Len

   P.S.   I hope more to come in the near future.

Edited by Greaser007 - 13 Mar. 2019 at 12:06pm
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote oldtime Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 Mar. 2019 at 7:37pm
Makes little difference whether you choose to go T98 or T18.

However the T18 is a slightly simplified design yielding slightly increased service life and it has better parts availability.

T98 = 6.40 > LOW
WR T18 = 6.32 > LOW

I can't see the side of your IH T18 but it looks top be early (pre 1979). ???
If so, then you can swap the complete shift tower assemblies between them.
Same basic early vs late restriction concerning swapping of the cases.

Otherwise "VERY" few parts will interchange.
Basically one can swap counter shafts and countershaft bearings but certainly not the cluster gear from T98 to T18.
Little else of any consequence will be a direct swap.

You can easily stick electrode the mild steel onto the bellhousing using AC current and nickel rod.
Use a high nickel content rod (55%) if you plan to machine the welds.
A lower nickel content is acceptable (35%) if you grind the welds.
I would go ahead and mount the whatever transmission case directly onto the bellhousing and then attach the "ears" as desired.



Currently building my final F-134 powered 3B .
T98-A Rock Crawler using exclusive factory parts and Approved Special Equipment from the Willys Motors era (1953-1963)
Zero aftermarket parts

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Greaser007 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 Mar. 2019 at 11:22pm
Exactly as I have been thinking.

What i am doing here is throwing out ideas that other members can digest, and may have already tossed-around many times in our heads. I am open to suggestions.
   In this concept, I am attempting to fabricate mounting ears to the L134 bellhousing so the T-98 Ford pattern case can be bolted direct to the bell.

   Once the index or pilot hole in the bellhousing is enlarged to match the front bearing retainer, then I would simply bolt the new Ears to the T-98 transmission ears and then set the transmission down into the bellhousing and rotate to satisfaction, and then weld the new Ears to the bellhousing.
After that I would probably have to take the bellhousing to the machine shop to get the mounting face Surfaced.

   My understanding is that the T-18 innards can be installed into the T-98 case.
And then again, not being "up-to-date" on all of the differences between the t-18 and t-98, I cannot do anything until I get the two torn down, which I won't attempt until I get real serious.

    Below is my afternoon Quickie "mock-up":

I overlayed the two faces (the face of the L134 bellhousing and the face of the T-98 Ford case) to compile the new Mounting Ears.




This above photo shows the new Mounting Ears to be welded to the bellhousing after first being bolted to the transmission ears. In my case the bolt holes are 9/16" diameter.

I must admit, I am no expert by any means, and the only benefit I can see of this modification would be to eliminate a front spacer plate similar to the old Optional T-98 to f134 set-up.
   I have always pictured using an adapter plate, and if having to have a long FSJ wagon or long T-98 Ford shaft shortened and re-splined, then they can maybe be cut down to a long enough length to accommodate an adapter plate of 7/8-inch thickness.

   Today, I contacted a local machine shop, and the gentleman said he would not attempt to cut down the splines, because it would damage his tooling. ok.
He was asking how I would remove the temper first. Uhhh, how about a crankshaft grinder ? ?
   So, now I must contact my buddies gear-maker in Portland to see what he has to say.
   I have not made any determinations of critical dimensions, nor have I looked into my options for a throw-out bearing, but I don't forsee any problems with modifying a throw-out fork to my needs after choosing a front bearing retainer, and am hoping to stay with the ford issue. We'll see.

    In the meantime, I have really enjoyed the fine work that Falcon is doing in his machining and modifications which is very similar to the one that he had shown that his buddy compiled. And too, even though Falcon has bolted the bellhousing onto the transmission, I wasn't clear on whether the transmission can be bolted to the bellhousing once the bellhousing is in-place attached to the engine. Or if engine must be installed after the transmission / bellhousing is installed. I am Admiring his expertise big time ! Nice Work.

Attached is an interesting article, and I have read few:
http://www.earlycj5.com/xf_cj5/index.php?threads/my-lengthy-borg-warner-t18-rebuild-thread.105325/page-5

I bookmarked a thread from 2002 or thereabouts in which the guy described the differences internally between the T-18 / T-98 and I plan to put my scout T-18 innards into the Ford T-98 transmission case.

Also, I have been reading about the differences in small-hole and large hole transfer cases and rear bearing adapters for large to small-hole, and have not written down any of this, so you can see my "bookmarks" are getting cluttered.
And my Brain is aching if I try to absorb too much at one sitting.

   
Early Ford GPW bellhousing -   it may have a high content of nickel.

   So, I was going to glue-gun the new Ears to the bellhousing, but that would have been messy, so I just used transparent tape.    hahahaha

   Len

Edited by Greaser007 - 13 Mar. 2019 at 11:31pm
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Millennium falcon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 Mar. 2019 at 4:48pm
Len, Looks like your off to a good start. I got the same response from my local machine shops when I talked to them about the input shaft.... I get the feeling they just dont want to do it.... Yes, they are hard, but not that hard. Carbide and patience and I had my shaft down to size... probably took me two hours. It appeared as though they were case hardened. Once I got under the outer layer it was not nearly as hard. Any "real" shop and machinist should be able to handle that task. I would just use moser. They are no-nonsense.... they know what they are doing and they do it well.....and quickly. 

With my setup the trans and bell will need to be bolted together before installation. This doesn't bother me too much I never heard of pulling the engine or body to change a transmission until this year. Ive changed a few cj2a t90s and I always left the bell attached. The t18 will be a bigger and heavier but I will get her in there.  

Keep up the good work.... I will be following! 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote oldtime Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 Mar. 2019 at 7:08pm
Your bellhousing mock up looks great !
I see no probs with that.

Quote After that I would probably have to take the bellhousing to the machine shop to get the mounting face Surfaced.
So long as the rear bellhousing face is unaffected I see no reason to have it refaced.

Quote  My understanding is that the T-18 innards can be installed into the T-98 case.
Yes all T98/18  cases can interchange so long as you don't cross between the 1978/1979 design change.

I agree the only advantage to direct mounting of transmission to bellhousing is in saving 7/8" thickness of the adapter plate.
I bolted the standard T98-A into a 3B frame (80" wheelbase) 
The drivetrain length is the absolute maximum possible without effecting the rear propeller shaft angles and the standard rear suspension travel.
The short rear propeller shaft is at maximum possible angle with rear axle able to fully droop and stuff.

Yes jeep used two almost identical rear adapter plates. 
One for small hole cases the other for big hole cases.
The only difference is the diameter of the TC index bore ring.

All CJ T98's  were originally mated to small hole cases.
Some Trucks and Wagoneers had T98 and big hole cases
All T18 were mated to big hole cases.

Yes the head spins until you tear into them and see for yourself...

Currently building my final F-134 powered 3B .
T98-A Rock Crawler using exclusive factory parts and Approved Special Equipment from the Willys Motors era (1953-1963)
Zero aftermarket parts

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Nothing Special Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 Mar. 2019 at 7:15pm
Originally posted by Millennium falcon Millennium falcon wrote:

Len, Looks like your off to a good start. I got the same response from my local machine shops when I talked to them about the input shaft.... I get the feeling they just dont want to do it.... Yes, they are hard, but not that hard. Carbide and patience and I had my shaft down to size... probably took me two hours....

Interrupted cuts (like cutting away splines) in hardened material are the hardest on cutters.  You need carbide for the hardened steel and carbide hates interrupted cuts (it's brittle and it will chip away).  As you note, taking light cuts is the way to keep the tool from breaking, so you need to take it slow.  Machine shops don't want to take that much time (and you probably wouldn't want to pay the $100(?)/hour shop rate for them to take 2 hours doing it either.  But it can definitely be done if you're willing to take the time (and you could probably get a shop to do it if you tell them to take their time and you'll pay their full rate!).
Bob

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Lee (MN) Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 Mar. 2019 at 5:53am
Most machine shops are not into spline or gearcutting, if you locate a shop that specializes in gearcutting they will find no challenge in a project like this, and most likely be very reasonable in price!.

Lee
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Millennium falcon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 Mar. 2019 at 8:39am
Moser is a good example of that. They said “sure, seems straight forward” $75 and 48 hours and it was in the mail on its way back to me. Can’t beat that!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Nothing Special Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 Mar. 2019 at 11:41am
I was only speaking to turning down the existing spline.  That would be straightforward were it not for the interrupted cut on hardened material.  Any machine shop could do this, but they might not think they can make money doing it.

Actually cutting splines, or worse yet, gear teeth, involves tighter tolerances.  A lot of machine shops might not accept a job to make splines (and very few will agree to cut gears).  But as Seth is pointing out, a company that regularly splines shaft can be a good option!
Bob

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Greaser007 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 Mar. 2019 at 12:04pm
Thanks guys for the support. I feel we are not the only individuals wanting to do this conversion to retain the L134 engine. I just love the sound of the little L134 engine. :)

Bob and Lee:   yep, the interrupted cutting was the machinist's concern.

Seth, whether we attach the bellhousing to the transmission first before the engine or being able to remove the trans from the bellhousing with engine intact is a PIA either way we go. And, IF we get lucky and all works according to plan, we should enjoy years of wheeling before the engine / trans needs to be separated.   
   I went skiing with my buddy yesterday at Mount Shasta (icy - yuck), and we talked about his buddy in Portland, Oregon, who sold his gear-making business 3 years ago, and I forgot to get the fella's phone number to see what he suggests for possible input shaft mods here on the west coast.

   I am going to have to do another "mock-up" of crank in block and flywheel and clutch disc together to check depth dimensions from face-of-bellhousing in to the engine-side face of the splined center portion of the clutch disc to determine my spec for the end of new splines and shaft-snout protrusion.

( in the back of my mind, I am pondering having a new input shaft long enough to allow a front adapter plate to circumvent welding ears onto the bellhousing.
but time will tell ) I haven't persued a CNN machine shop yet for a plate.

   Another thing I haven't investigated in-depth is my choices of throw-out bearing to be used.   This search could get lengthly unless napa has a chart of throwout bearings by size and dimension, like when we purchase bearings.
The interchange world is quite Vast.

   Seth, the nice thing about your bearing retainer adapter is that it utilizes the T-90 throw out bearing and fork. a Plus for not having a "hodge-podge" of bits and pieces.

   Speaking of bits and pieces: it reminds me of my '78 Ford van 4x4 that I converted in 1993. It is kind of a hodge-podge of sorts.   hahahha
Here is a small list of pieces for those interested:
the front axle is a '78 Ford pickup High-Pinion Dana 44 from an F-250.
It came from a totaled Quadra-Van if anyone remembers those. They were built in Salt Lake city I think. And had a real-funky 4-link set-up that I just couldn't relate to. So, after scouring wrecking yards with measuring tape in hand, I discovered that the front leaf springs and hangars off of an early '70's Wagoneer had the correct length of springs eye-to-eye for the Van.
   The Dana 44 has the '86 Chevy 3/4 ton Knuckles, spindles, 8-lug wheel hubs and brake rotors and the chevy Calipers. Nice brakes.
   I then went to Dyna-Trac and ordered a high-mount steering arm to mount to the pass side steering knuckle, then fabbed up crossover steering from O.E.M. Ford and chevy tie rods and drag-links.
   Note, the power steering box on the Van does not have to be changed to accommodate cross-over steering. Kinda nice.   _ _ I drifted

   Years ago there was a Nissan Pathfinder commercial showing the pathfinder flying through the desert with kids heads bobbing in the back seat, and I always related to that commercial when taking the family (3-kids) and dogs to our favorite camping hole on the creek. I would play like we were racing the Baja 1000, and would be tacked out in 2-nd gear highrange flying across our favorite access road, and the rig shuddered so bad from the rough terrain, I thought the front axle would get torn from the chassis. The only parts that failed were the Ball Joints, and they got Hammered. So, Ball joints were replaced on a frequent basis because of the punishment.   such Fun putting the hammer-down and drifting with the kids yelling G0 Dad !

   Today, no mock-ups, but yesterday I began doing some cleaning on the Scout T-18.   As I was shifting the transfer case and playing the with front output yoke on the T-case, I think I may have something going on inside the T-case, because I was feeling more slack in gears than my liking.   Hmm
Further investigation is required, so i'll have to remove the T-case from the T-18 to see what I find. I mostly bought this for the T-18 and not so much for the T-case (D-300 straight-thru) which came with it.

   When I get the outside of the T-18 cleaned, then I will pull the top and count teeth.

   Seems I was reading somewhere that the hole in the front of the T-98 case may have to be enlarged to accept the T-18 front input bearing race ?

   I am not there yet, but maybe Oldtimer or one of you on-the-know can keep us up to date on the slight differences to expect.
   
   Thank you Seth for mentioning the cutting and turning concerns, and as you mention, I am probably best to contact Moser to see what they would be willing to do for me. They will probably have some Good Suggestions.
   ( they will probably say "why don't you just buy a Terra-Low for the D18 transfer case and retain the T-90." ) hahahaha

   The more I look at he Hulk of the T-18, it is Big and overwhelming.
And the little T-90 with D-18 T-case with Terra-Low gears makes sense.
   What Challenge would that be. right !    hahahaha

   More later and to be continued _ _ _

   Len

   

   

Edited by Greaser007 - 15 Mar. 2019 at 12:11pm
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote oldtime Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 Mar. 2019 at 4:52pm
Quote Seems I was reading somewhere that the hole in the front of the T-98 case may have to be enlarged to accept the T-18 front input bearing race
No both the T98 and T18 use series 308 bearings at front and rear.
Currently building my final F-134 powered 3B .
T98-A Rock Crawler using exclusive factory parts and Approved Special Equipment from the Willys Motors era (1953-1963)
Zero aftermarket parts

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Millennium falcon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 Mar. 2019 at 9:17pm
Len, yes a t-90c and terra low gears would be a simple and quick way to get lower gearing. I thought about doing that.... but a t18 even with the stock 2.43 transfer gears is still a deeper low gear. I also like that second gear on the T18 which I use like first gear on the t90 is synchronized so you don’t have to come to a complete stop like you do going into first on a t90.... also T18’s don’t pop out if second gear! Haha!  It you are right, they are big and heavy and clunky.....but that’s part of the fun!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Greaser007 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 Mar. 2019 at 10:17am
Monday, March 18, 2019 _ _ _ T-18 Day !! yeay

Well, I try to keep inspired, and did do some cleaning-up on the Scout T-18 on Sunday, then drove to my dad's to go on a field-trip.

   I have not yet submersed my brain with the Transfer-Case end result, but my thoughts behind my use of the Scout internals being put into the Ford T-98 case will allow the Ford case to bolt to the new "ears" to be welded to the L134 bellhousing for compatibility (after having the L134 bellhousing bored to accept the diameter of the T-98/T-18 front bearing retainer).

   My Ultimate Plan for Transfer Case:

I want to utilize the offset rear transfer-case propeller-shaft setup. So, not being familiar with my options yet, I am thinking there may be someone who has made a rear 0utput option for the Dana 300 Transfer case.
   Please chime-in with ideas and thoughts for this.   I am thinking that several of you guys have maybe researched the possibilities for which transfer case may be the best option to consider bolting to the rear of the T-98/T-18 transmission.

   So, guys, would the Transfer-case from an early wagon have the large-hole transfer case ?
   I picked one from either a pickup or wagon which came with a T-90 3-speed, and I am thinking this may be the large-hole transfer case.
( I have not separated them yet ). So I don't know what I have got yet.
And, last year, I picked a T-90 with T-case and Warn rear-shift Overdrive unit.
This is set-up with the chevy input and advance adapter for the Dauntless V-6.
I have not separated these yet either. ( I am afraid of getting too many pieces and parts scattered about. And with all of the attempt at trying to absorb all of the details of this compilation _ _ my Brain is Muddled ! :)

Below is a link for some good reading about the T-18 and T-98 transmissions:

https://www.jeepfan.com/tech/jeeptech/transmission-factory-t98.htm

After having a T-18 in my '77 CJ-7 with the 304 V-8 (an easy swap w Novak), for 34-years now, I have not had any problems or failures with the setup.
There is One-Big-Benefit: very little stress on the clutch Disc.
My last year to run the Rubicon jeep trail was 2001, and on that trek, I braved the trail with no belly skid plate, and sure enough came down hard on the output end of my Transfer-case and it knocked the front mating seal loose, so I pulled the t-case and transmission for an 18-year inspection of parts.
What I found was that everything looked to be intact, and upon pulling the bellhousing off and the clutch cover and disc, except for normal wear, the disc was smooth and definitely worth re-installing. The 6:1 granny gear is very user-friendly on the clutch with very little slipping required.

   Seth, you're going to be very fond of your transmission swap !
And this is why I am perusing putting the T-98/T-18 behind the L134 engine.

The crossmember I fabbed-up for my T-18 install into my CJ-7 is out of 2x2x1/4 wall tube steel and replaces the original stamped steel belly-pan.
The skid-plate bolts onto tabs welded to the tube-steel with a curve up on front and rear alike to slide up-and-over knuckle-head-rocks. The front has a removable brace where it is notched to clear the front driveline.
    I will have to dig out my skid plate, which hasn't been on the jeep for several years.   Locally, I just don't have obstacles like what the Rubicon trail dishes out. That Rubicon trail is punishing on man and machine _ _ unless the machine has been dealt a few nice features like power steering and 6:1 crawler-gears.   And like Seth reminded us, the 2nd gear (1st-in T-90) in the T-18 is synchronized which is a treat.

My first year through the Rubicon, 1983, I met an old-gray-haired guy (he looked old), driving a super-clean '48 flattie with 350-chev and a 6:1 granny trans, which his was probably an SM 420. He was taking the side-trail to the north around the Little-Sluice-Box, and creepy-crawled up and over through the trees, and didn't appear to strain a knuckle. We had a very inspiring talk about the granny transmission gearing and tossing rocks. One of his first words of Advice to a successful trek through, was to not listen to your buddies when the tell you to "get-back-and-put-the-hammer-Down".    His Advice was that when all forward momentum Stops, to then calmly shut off the engine, look closely underneath the jeep, and toss a few rocks to save stress on equipment.
His stealth-black flat-fender was shiny and straight. Quite an Inspiration.

Note: the following Thread I use as my "Portal" to the CJ2A forums page:

https://www.thecj2apage.com/forums/topic1098.html

   More to come, and feel free to share thoughts or helpful Links guys & gals.

   Len

Edited by Greaser007 - 18 Mar. 2019 at 10:24am
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Greaser007 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 Mar. 2019 at 1:45pm
The following article explains that the later 70-something T-18's have reverse in the "over-an-down" position. I am wanting that for my build !

https://www.off-road.com/jeep/tech/jeep-transmissions-t98-t18-t18a-19793.html

There have been numerous times where in desperation to get up a slick hill, to shift-quickly from 2-nd to 3-rd. When reverse is in the "over-an-up" position, it conflicts with making a Desperate shift "over-an-up" to 3-rd gear.
That is probably the only fault I have of my "over-and-up" earlier T-18.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Nothing Special Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 Mar. 2019 at 7:52pm
Originally posted by Greaser007 Greaser007 wrote:

.... When reverse is in the "over-an-up" position, it conflicts with making a Desperate shift "over-an-up" to 3-rd gear.....

Been there, done that Ouch  And when you're flustered after hitting reverse it's pretty easy to overshoot when going back for 3rd and grabbing the non-synchroed 1st!

My '75 CJ5 had the "over and up" reverse T-18 (close ratio).  There's a spring that you need to compress to get the shifter into the reverse shift fork... unless that spring is broken, like it was when I bought that Jeep.  Fortunately I was able to replace the spring.  Never made that "2 to R" speed shift again after that!
Bob

Flatfender wannabe
'71 Ford Bronco
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote otto Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 Mar. 2019 at 8:06pm
The article didn’t say, but do the shift towers interchange? I have mis-shifted a T-18 many times.
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48 CJ2A
Forgive me if I don't return the "jeep wave", I need both hands on the wheel!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Lee (MN) Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 Mar. 2019 at 9:30pm
You guys need to ride with my wife in my M715, when she is trying to shift into 5th gear at highway speed not a pretty sound at all

Lee
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