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Transfer Case Progression

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Rick G View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Rick G Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 08 Sep. 2018 at 10:16pm
Such great info, Ken.  Thanks for educating us! 
1947 CJ2a #119929    "Gus"
1951 CJ3a #451-GB1-24268   “Some Assembly Required”

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oldtime View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote oldtime Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 Oct. 2018 at 11:05am
Like I said this  attempt toward "Transfer Case Progression" certainly was not intended to be exhaustive.
I opened up about as many gaps as I filled.
Mainly I felt a need to provide some background info before I got started describing the typical transfer case modifications.
IMHO, One really needs a baseline before considering any changes to the assemblies.

I see many things that I failed to mention.
Like the changes made to the intermediate shafts or the change over to  "crimp lock nuts" for the output shafts.
Speedometer drives were never mentioned and so much more that was neglected.

At any rate I hope the text provided at least some small detail that may have been enlightening to the reader.


Currently building my final F-134 powered 3B .
T98-A Rock Crawler using exclusive factory parts and Approved Special Equipment from the Willys Motors era (1953-1963)
Zero aftermarket parts

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote oldtime Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 Oct. 2018 at 8:36pm
D18 / D20 Casting Identification

Casting numbers were used by all manufactures.
Ross, Willys, Borg Warner, Dana Spicer and others use them identify their blank castings.
The blanks often times are machined in various ways to create similar yet different parts.
So typically a casting number is not the same as the finished part number.
The only time a casting number is the same as the part number is when only a single part could be machined from any particular casting. 
I expect this basic method of casting identification should hold true for all manufacturers.

A casting number was issued by Dana Spicer to identify various castings prior to machining.
These numbers most often are embossed into the cast
Often times Jeep and IH or others will utilize the exact same Dana Spicer castings and parts.
However the completed IH and JEEP assemblies will certainly be different and so those parts or those assembled units will mandate distinct IH and Jeep part numbers.

Jeep always referenced these various Spicer castings and all other components by way of their own part numbers.
Jeep also used another number to designate every unique transfer case assembly.
If ever a single component of the complete transfer case assembly was changed; then a new assembly number was used to identify each unique unit.
The change required to merit a distinct assembly number could be as simple as a change of the speedometer ratio.

Here you see how Jeep eventually began to identify variations of case assemblies using an assembly number tag.


Small Hole  Castings

My oldest pre-civilian Jeep parts are all long gone but....
Here is a pic of the oldest transfer case that I currently have.
This casting was from well after the early Brown/Lipe era.
It's definitely from a 1960 CJ-3B.
What you see here is the Dana Spicer embossed casting number.
The C-18-15-10 designation was common to all DS small bore cases.
The -3 suggests it's the 3rd variation of this particular casting.
This particular machined casting weighs in at 25-3/4 pounds.


Big Hole Castings

The earliest big hole casting I have is from a from an early 1966 Dauntless CJ-5 with big hole D18 (built in December of 1965)


This particular casting weighed in at 23-3/4 pounds.
As you will see all big hole castings were embossed with C 18-15-24
The "2" indicates that Dana Spicer was already casting their second version of the big hole case by 1966.

Here we see a nearly identical casting from a 1967 IH Scout Dana 20. 


This particular casting weighed in at:24-1/2 pounds.
I can only detect one simple difference between the 1966 Jeep D18 casting and the 1967 IH D20 casting.
The Jeep D18 was tapped for clutch control while the IH D20 casting was not.
So these two cases obviously have the exact same Dana Spicer casting number.
Yet the Jeep part number and the IH part number are completely independent.

Here we see a -5 version of the big hole case.
This particular casting weighed in at 24-1/2 pounds.

Here you see the only design change that occurred sometime between the -2 version and  the -5 version.

Here again is the -2:


And this is the -5:


Here we see a -6 version of the big hole case.
This particular casting weighed in at: 25-3/4 pounds.

The -6 version retains the same Texas pattern re-design as the -5 casting.
But beginning with the -6  the left side fill plug was ommitted and replaced with a rear fill plug.

Remember....Due to rear bearing cap location the rear fill only works with D20 assemblies and not the D18 assemblies.

Currently building my final F-134 powered 3B .
T98-A Rock Crawler using exclusive factory parts and Approved Special Equipment from the Willys Motors era (1953-1963)
Zero aftermarket parts

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Greaser007 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 Mar. 2019 at 11:05pm
Very good digesting !
Thank you for putting all of this "pictorially" together for us.
I knew most of this 35-years ago, and it faded away over time quickly.
Trying to digest and retain all of this is taxing on the brain and I should be creating a Microsoft Word document for myself, but haven't.
   The internet is full of this information, and a dauntless task to read through to learn. Then, in the end, hands-on is wonderful.

   This has been of great help for me.

   Len

    
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