Forum Home Forum Home > CJ-2A Discussion Area > Your Jeep Project
  New Posts New Posts RSS Feed - WellFedHobo's '48 CJ2A project (#158011)
  FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Events   Register Register  Login Login

WellFedHobo's '48 CJ2A project (#158011)

 Post Reply Post Reply Page  <123>
Author
Message
Ol' Unreliable View Drop Down
Member
Member
Avatar

Joined: 25 Sep. 2016
Location: CO Springs CO
Status: Offline
Points: 4116
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Ol' Unreliable Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 07 Sep. 2020 at 6:53pm
If you can see the rivets, the plate is likely still there.  
There's a reason it's called Ol' Unreliable
Back to Top
WellFedHobo View Drop Down
Member
Member
Avatar

Joined: 15 Sep. 2010
Location: Little Rock, AR
Status: Offline
Points: 112
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote WellFedHobo Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 07 Sep. 2020 at 6:58pm

This took all day. The headlight buckets did NOT want to come free. They were in good shape but the screws? not so much. All that's left on it is that footman loop at the top center but its not coming out easily. I may try once more but I don't know... 

I keep going back and forth on our order of operations. If we tear it down too much more, we won't be able to throw it back together and drive it around as-is. But if we don't tear it down, we won't find all the sources of the leaks and other issues that need to be addressed. (The grille was torn down so we can replace all of the rodent chewed wires and such, for instance.) I hope to soak all fasteners in Evaporust and wire wheel what's left before reusing them. And if it all ends up thrown back together sooner rather than later, I'll probably use some anti-seize here and there so it becomes easier to take apart again for the final restoration part of the project.

I've also been going back and forth on replacing the tub vs repairing it. When pricing out replacement panels such as the floor and cross support between floor panels and such, we're already at around 50% of a new tub before buying a welder. 
Back to Top
Ol' Unreliable View Drop Down
Member
Member
Avatar

Joined: 25 Sep. 2016
Location: CO Springs CO
Status: Offline
Points: 4116
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Ol' Unreliable Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 07 Sep. 2020 at 7:22pm
A lot of the guys have had to do cutting-and-welding on parts of even a brand-new repro tub just so everything fits properly.
There's a reason it's called Ol' Unreliable
Back to Top
WellFedHobo View Drop Down
Member
Member
Avatar

Joined: 15 Sep. 2010
Location: Little Rock, AR
Status: Offline
Points: 112
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote WellFedHobo Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 Sep. 2020 at 1:12pm
Maybe I'm jumping the gun but I wanted to get the "legitimacy" of the Jeep out of the way given that it has been off the radar for over 40 years. As of this morning, the Jeep is registered and titled in my name. There were some bumps to get past and the guy had to take a few close looks at the '70s vintage title, but it worked out in the end. It even has a very basic insurance policy on it while it's non-running. (Required to register it.) Got a nice antique tag for it so I don't have to deal with the annual renewals.

We almost got it started yesterday. It fired briefly but without a good fuel supply it won't run. Seems like someone in the past probably tried to work on it and didn't go too far. With a fresh Group 35 battery, it cranks solidly and even with junk mismatched spark plugs, it has a good strong blue spark. The problem right now is fuel. The fuel pump fills up but no fuel gets pumped out. Looks like the check valve/strainer is gunked up. I'll see about taking that apart and cleaning it soon. I'm certainly not against buying a rebuild kit for the fuel pump though. I will certainly be checking compression to make sure that low compression isn't why it was parked. (I'm hoping the rusty body was why it was parked... though it has a loud wheel bearing too.) Brake parts should be in soon if Mike or Wayne at Kaiser Willys don't find more of the order out of stock and on backorder. 

I'm going to have to restrain myself on this project soon. I've been out there almost daily wrenching on something, buying parts and supplies and tools. Honestly I needed a project like this to get my mind off of work stress but these projects sure can snowball easily. I want everything cleaned up and perfect but it will be a couple of years before it's there. I have a list of tools to buy that, even used, will be pricey. I still have a list of basic parts and safety stuff to get done. I have a list of lists so I can keep track of my lists. But I guess that's how it goes. This is my first major project outside of the Bantam trailer so I should expect more of this.

[Late edit] I did finally get the fuel pump off. Since it's an M38 engine it had the longer bolts with the spacers and my thick extension didn't want to fit. I had a (bent) thinner extension and that got in there. I can't imagine trying to get in there on the trail without the fender off.  The fuel pump bowl was full of mud? and it seems that maybe the diaphragm is toast. I haven't torn it down just yet but either I missed some gas when I first drained it or some gas poured out of the side that goes into the crankcase. Confused


Edited by WellFedHobo - 11 Sep. 2020 at 10:32pm
Back to Top
WellFedHobo View Drop Down
Member
Member
Avatar

Joined: 15 Sep. 2010
Location: Little Rock, AR
Status: Offline
Points: 112
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote WellFedHobo Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 Sep. 2020 at 8:22pm
Somewhere in the back of my mind, I knew this... But just for anyone else's sake who starts a project like this...

When you are taking the rear drive shaft off to do work on the emergency brake, you should remember to drain the transfer case first. If you don't... the transfer case will drain itself for you. LOL

I'm certainly no expert on this, but the gear oil in the transfer case probably isn't supposed to look like Pumpkin Spice SAE 90 and smell like a pack of old fig newtons mixed with wet potting soil. But that's what my garage smells like now. 

Additionally. my exhaust manifold is rusted through and the heat riser is stuck solid. With the hole in it, I'll probably have to hunt for a replacement manifold in the long run.


Edited by WellFedHobo - 15 Sep. 2020 at 9:29pm
Back to Top
SlaterDoc View Drop Down
Member
Member
Avatar

Joined: 02 Mar. 2020
Location: Catskills, NY
Status: Offline
Points: 65
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote SlaterDoc Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 Sep. 2020 at 9:54pm
Funny how metalshaper just posted a video about a stuck heat riser!

Once a Navy man, always a Navy man!
Back to Top
WellFedHobo View Drop Down
Member
Member
Avatar

Joined: 15 Sep. 2010
Location: Little Rock, AR
Status: Offline
Points: 112
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote WellFedHobo Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 Sep. 2020 at 10:27pm
Originally posted by SlaterDoc SlaterDoc wrote:

Funny how metalshaper just posted a video about a stuck heat riser!


That's exactly how I knew to check it while I was poking around on the Jeep today. Very informative channel, totally worth the subscription.
Back to Top
Tartone View Drop Down
Member
Member
Avatar

Joined: 19 Aug. 2018
Location: Virginia
Status: Offline
Points: 87
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Tartone Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 Sep. 2020 at 12:23pm
Originally posted by WellFedHobo WellFedHobo wrote:

Somewhere in the back of my mind, I knew this... But just for anyone else's sake who starts a project like this...

When you are taking the rear drive shaft off to do work on the emergency brake, you should remember to drain the transfer case first. If you don't... the transfer case will drain itself for you. LOL

I'm certainly no expert on this, but the gear oil in the transfer case probably isn't supposed to look like Pumpkin Spice SAE 90 and smell like a pack of old fig newtons mixed with wet potting soil. But that's what my garage smells like now. 

Additionally. my exhaust manifold is rusted through and the heat riser is stuck solid. With the hole in it, I'll probably have to hunt for a replacement manifold in the long run.

Sitting in a virtual meeting killing time, this post made me chuckle to myself.  If they did have Pumpkin Spice 90W I'd buy a couple jugs.
Back to Top
WellFedHobo View Drop Down
Member
Member
Avatar

Joined: 15 Sep. 2010
Location: Little Rock, AR
Status: Offline
Points: 112
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote WellFedHobo Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 Sep. 2020 at 12:31pm
Originally posted by Tartone Tartone wrote:

Sitting in a virtual meeting killing time, this post made me chuckle to myself.  If they did have Pumpkin Spice 90W I'd buy a couple jugs.

It would certainly smell better than this. Once I get off virtual work, I need to get out there and hose it down with something. Anything. The smell is starting to permeate into the house... 
Back to Top
Rockgod1619 View Drop Down
Member
Member
Avatar

Joined: 01 July 2020
Location: NE Oklahoma
Status: Offline
Points: 139
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Rockgod1619 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 Sep. 2020 at 12:54pm
When I changed my transmission and transfer case oil, it had that same look and aroma. The new oil is much more bueno!
'51 CJ3a - Papa Doc (51829)
Back to Top
WellFedHobo View Drop Down
Member
Member
Avatar

Joined: 15 Sep. 2010
Location: Little Rock, AR
Status: Offline
Points: 112
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote WellFedHobo Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 Sep. 2020 at 12:00am
Ran into a snag... Here's the parking brake backing plate. It's missing a few pieces... Including the critical anchor for the brake pads on the right side. Got a replacement part on the way, it unfortunately has to be welded on and I don't have a welder just yet. Gotta check with a local fab shop or two and see if they will tack it on for me.



The parts pile is starting to grow. Got the new fuel tank in, lost a bit of paint in shipping but it's all there and not dented. 


Got all the emergency brake parts minus a small plate and a single nut of unknown thread pitch... plus a replacement anchor for the backing plate. New soft lines, wheel cylinders, radiator stopcock, thermostat, and some replacement axle nut covers for the rear (missing one, the other is bent). S lines are still backordered... Maybe next week.



My brake hard lines look ok, not original but not brand new. The master cylinder is leaking :/ so I will be replacing it as well once I find out if it's the threaded type or not. I'm on the fence about whether or not to put the dual reservoir master cylinder in at this time or not. It would be much easier if the body was off but that's not happening just yet. A single reservoir one would be a drop in replacement but until I have a functional emergency brake... it seems best to go for the dual reservoir? Though it requires modification and removal of the existing bracket. 

I don't know.



Edited by WellFedHobo - 18 Sep. 2020 at 12:02am
Back to Top
TateC View Drop Down
Member
Member
Avatar

Joined: 22 Feb. 2018
Location: SLC, Utah
Status: Offline
Points: 342
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TateC Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 Sep. 2020 at 12:45am
Nice progress, I think you’d be just fine to run a singe reservoir master cylinder now and forever. They stopped all types of vehicles for decades with no trouble. As long as you’ve inspected the steel lines and rubber lines (as should be done on any vehicle) you’ll never have trouble. 
Tate Christensen
1941 Ford GP #9687
1943 Willys MB #263100
1944 Ford GPW #234613
1945 Willys CJ2A #10226
Back to Top
WellFedHobo View Drop Down
Member
Member
Avatar

Joined: 15 Sep. 2010
Location: Little Rock, AR
Status: Offline
Points: 112
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote WellFedHobo Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 Sep. 2020 at 10:44pm
I've started an extremely rambling YouTube channel on this Jeep revival. It's my first YouTube channel and I'm embarrassed by the first 5 episodes thus far, as I wasn't sure if I was actually going to go through with it. But it exists. I talk to much and overthink everything while doing things in the wrong order while trying to learn about old Jeeps. Maybe someday I'll get there. https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCRx3tmqqxfIvDd880MTCLFg


Today's adventure involved rebuilding the carburetor. Never messed with carbs before, I've always run fuel injected vehicles. Tore it down, cleaned it, and rebuilt it for the most part using the master rebuild kit. It's not perfectly set up as I lack the two Carter tools for doing it right so it's a best guess right now until the proper tools are ordered and I dial it in. 



It was one of the standard later style Carter WO ones. Seems original to the M38 engine that's in the Jeep. Possibly rebuilt once before based on some of the parts.



It won't win any beauty pageants but it's slightly cleaner and pieces move more freely. Tomorrow we get to find out if I reassembled it correctly and maybe we'll have enough pieces in place to get the engine to fire and run. Fingers crossed. I think I've done enough prep work that it may be ok to give it a go.
Back to Top
WellFedHobo View Drop Down
Member
Member
Avatar

Joined: 15 Sep. 2010
Location: Little Rock, AR
Status: Offline
Points: 112
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote WellFedHobo Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 Sep. 2020 at 11:22pm
It runs! But it won't stay running.

It was pouring smoke out of the intake tube so rcrhea correctly diagnosed it as a very badly clogged PCV that likely had never been dealt with. He disassembled, cleaned thoroughly, and reassembled it. We're both unsure what the PCV is supposed to look like on the inside other than that it has a metal cone and a spring in it. Once it was cleaned the Jeep started up and ran a little better but only as long as we pressed the accelerator. (We still don't have a good fuel delivery system in place. More parts on the way.)

He also mentioned a thread on here suggesting an adjustment to the idle screw, which I reset by tightening it then loosening it by a turn and a half. This makes it sound more like an L134 should when it's running, but it still won't stay running. (Could easily be fuel related as we basically just filled the fuel pump enough to pump gas to the carb, then put the lines back together. 

I suppose I need to check the exhaust and see if anything is actually coming out the tail pipe as well.
Back to Top
WellFedHobo View Drop Down
Member
Member
Avatar

Joined: 15 Sep. 2010
Location: Little Rock, AR
Status: Offline
Points: 112
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote WellFedHobo Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23 Sep. 2020 at 10:02pm
Finally got the last few parts needed for the emergency brake rebuild. The major snag is that the anchor was missing from the backing plate. I acquired a replacement anchor but do not have a welder. I'll have to find a local fab shop or friend with a welder that can tack it on for me. After that, the rest of the pieces should just go right on. The replacement brake cable is already in place, held on with two clips like it's supposed to be. 

Should have one more order of parts arriving tomorrow, the new master cylinder being the most notable part. This will allow me to replace the brakes from master cylinder to wheel cylinders, excluding the hard lines (so far). The two S lines are apparently still backordered... The rest of the lines appear to have been replaced already at some point and aren't in bad shape. 
Back to Top
WellFedHobo View Drop Down
Member
Member
Avatar

Joined: 15 Sep. 2010
Location: Little Rock, AR
Status: Offline
Points: 112
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote WellFedHobo Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24 Sep. 2020 at 8:55pm
I've been making the most of this vacation week when it comes to the Jeep. Today I got the old backing plate off the emergency brake, got it cleaned up and taken to a local welder who was able to weld on my replacement anchor for the brake shoes. New gas tank, fuel sending unit/gasket, new plugs, and new wires were installed. The distributor cap got cleaned up, found some corrosion I wasn't aware of. Got the final parts of the missing emergency brake mocked up so I understand their function. 

At this point, the fuel system should be pretty close to solid. (Maybe the carb isn't 100% yet though.)

The ignition system is in a much better place now. I couldn't replace the coil wire because it was too short as the coil was relocated to the passenger floorboard. The distributor cap is meh, but it's in better shape now. Rotor looked fine. Points and condense fine. Coil itself, fine.

I think if we can get the air out of the fuel lines, we should be able to further diagnose the lack of idling. Once we can get it running idling, we can test compression and find out if all of this was simply academic because the engine is toast anyways or not. Exciting.

Tomorrow, we try to get it running again. Again. And perhaps I get the parking break functioning for the first time in a very long time.

Meanwhile, I've been doing a lot of blog style videos of me rambling about this project. Those are going up on the YouTube channel mentioned a few posts up. I'm still days behind on episodes because I'm a real newbie on YouTube, but I'm almost caught up to current days and current progress.
Back to Top
Michaeltru View Drop Down
Member
Member

Sponsor Member x 2

Joined: 21 Oct. 2012
Location: Arizona
Status: Online
Points: 345
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Michaeltru Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Yesterday at 12:24am
Turn in idle mixture screw while engine running. When the engine starts to die, turn the screw out ‘til engine running smoothly. Fine tune to find “sweet spot” where engine sounds smoothest
Mike in AZ
Back to Top
WellFedHobo View Drop Down
Member
Member
Avatar

Joined: 15 Sep. 2010
Location: Little Rock, AR
Status: Offline
Points: 112
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote WellFedHobo Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 4 hours 37 minutes ago at 9:22pm
Originally posted by Michaeltru Michaeltru wrote:

Turn in idle mixture screw while engine running. When the engine starts to die, turn the screw out ‘til engine running smoothly. Fine tune to find “sweet spot” where engine sounds smoothest

Well... Today's where we found the problem. The idle stop screw on the back doesn't really touch the stop on the casting even with the set screw all the way in. Looks like there's just overall a lot of wear and tear on the thing? There's a ton of play on it. We've taken it apart and put it back together twice and today it actually ran pretty well but just won't idle on its own. It won't run without the choke all the way closed. I tried starting at one and a half turns on the mixture screw, then went to two turns, really no effect on it. Not sure what all that means. It runs but it won't run without the choke on.

We put on the new plugs and wires so that's at least out of the way. Should have been out of the way earlier... but at least it's done.

Amazon showed up with my new compression tester just in time to use it. The Jeep was warmed up and had been running for a good 10 minutes solid so we used the tester almost as soon as the guy drove off. The numbers were as follows:



Given the very rough, smoky first starts and the exhaust being a little plugged (darned squirrels), plus the PCV being completely clogged, I was very pleased with these numbers. It doesn't even smoke anymore.

I did get further in my efforts to get the emergency brake fully redone. The backing plate was finally removed, thoroughly cleaned, and taken to a local fab shop who did me a solid and got the new anchor welded on. From there I wire wheeled it, cleaned it, and primed it. 



The emergency brake drum was in similarly cruddy condition. It got a similar treatment with brake-specific paint.



Both were baked for one hour at 200 degrees to cure the paint after the requisite drying time.



And now the old Bendix backing plate and brake drum look practically new. The goal is a full restoration eventually... so here's something perfect, beautiful, and shiny! (That no one will ever see because it's under the Jeep...LOL)



I'm not sure what to do at this point. The carb is really not my specialty when it comes to figuring out how to work past its wear and tear. I'll probably do the emergency brake setup tomorrow and have that out of the way. (Peace of mind because of the hill it's parked on...) After that, the carb is going to be the big question. I don't think taking it apart a fourth time will solve anything.
Back to Top
 Post Reply Post Reply Page  <123>
  Share Topic   

Forum Jump Forum Permissions View Drop Down

Forum Software by Web Wiz Forums® version 12.03
Copyright ©2001-2019 Web Wiz Ltd.